Pigeon Coops

just got my new pigeons in the new pigeon coop…

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=20006

by  PhillipTaylor and my 10 month old pup is going crazy! Sitting underneath barking non-stop, standing up on his hind two legs sniffing through the cracks in the wood in the coop and jumping up underneath and banging his head in the wire beneath the coop. The birds are pretty smart- they are trying to hide fom him. I guess I’ll have to put up some latice around the legs of the coop to keep him from having too much access plus it will keep him from getting pooped on. I love seeing him so worked up!

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by  fishvik Other than the color of the dog and the openess of the yard this could be a reprint of my 16 month old GSP and our pigeon coop. My Hanna checks out the pigeons every morning as soon as I let her out.


by  Nebraska It’s like a big screen TV for dogs and certainly quality entertainment!!!


by  PhillipTaylor I woke up this morning to find that he had dug almost all the way under the latice I put up yesterday and there were big muddy paw prints on all four sides of the coop as high as he could reach. I am glad he is interested in birds but for those of you who have pigeon coops and don’t keep your dogs kenneled all day, do yours do this too or will he stop at some point?


by  mountaindogs I think your coop needs to be away from the dog. You left the dog in the yard overnight with a pigeon coop nearby? I worried about keeping the dogs near the coop but that is really near. If you have to keep that set up, can you put a kennel around the coop and line it with concrete pavers on the bottom? Still I think you are just a accident away from getting your birds killed or liberated


Exceptional Shorthair Gundog Litter

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=58&t=14754

by  AHGSP I am posting this for friends, Mike and Renee Martin and Family, though this was a Breeding Mike and I had talked about when I sold Jersey to Mike and was dependent upon both dogs working out to be high quality and healthy. Jersey had been my personal favorite/pick in the litter, as she just seemed to show that little something extra as a pup.
Dam and pups are located in Kansas City, MO. Shipping is not an issue and I’ll be making a trip from WV to pick up at least 2 of these pups when ready, approximately the last week of November, offering alternative transport.

There are 11 pups with 5 available currently. 4 Liver/White Females, 1 Liver/White Male, 4 Solid Liver Females and 2 Solid Liver Males.
Pups Pedigree: http://almostheavengsps.netkennel.com/PedigreeView.asp?DogID=31675&HDR=Dalin%20x%20Jersey%20Litter%20Due%2010/08
You can click on the name of any dog in the Pedigree to scroll back through the Pedigree 9-10 Generations.

SIRE: Dalins Dealing Dalin VD Himmel SH, aka. Dalin
Dalin is a Senior Hunter having earned his Title with average scores of 57 out of 60; has 3 placements in 5 Trials run. The 2 Trials he didn’t place were Gundog Stakes where I chose to pick him up, 1 for moving each paw 2″ forward when he was 1 1/2 years old and 1 for not honoring. He has been Shown in Conformation to 12 Champion Points as well. ALL Owner Handled and Trained in his short 3 years. He is also avidly hunted on Ruffed Grouse 40 days or more per year in the Appalachians and has hunted Grouse and Doodles in Maine, Maryland and West Virginia. We will be continuing to Trial, Test and Show him, as well as hunting the heck out of him! He has been an exceptional Shorthair in all aspects from Ability to Personality and Trainability.

Pedigree: http://almostheavengsps.netkennel.com/PedigreeView.asp?DogID=12005&HDR=Dalins%20Dealing%20Dalin%20VD%20Himmel%20SH
Photo Albums: http://almostheavengsps.netkennel.com/PhotoAlbumView.asp?AlbumID=2002&HDR=Dalins%20Dealing%20Dalin%20VD%20Himmel%20Senior%20Hunter

DAM: Miss Jersey Raines JH, aka. Jersey
Jersey is a Junior Hunter and was “broke” while here to be bred and will be going after her Senior Title next Spring, as well as Trialing if I can talk her owner into it. She is a very snappy Shorthair that covers ground with a high head and misses nothing. She is extremely biddable, was honoring after only the 3rd time being shown another “dog on point”, was broke StoWS&F in just a few weeks and is an absolutely natural retriever. She is also an absolute joy to have in the home.
Photo Albums: http://almostheavengsps.netkennel.com/PhotoAlbumView.asp?AlbumID=5388&HDR=Miss%20Jersey%20Raines%20JH

From Jersey’s Owner, Mike Martin:
Jersey will be trialed next spring. After several AKC judges commented on how well her style is for Trialing. She is hunted 30 to 40 days per season in Northwest Missouri on Bobwhite Quail and in North Central Kansas on Ringneck Pheasant. As Bruce has mentioned she hunts with a high head and lots of bird drive. As well as a GREAT hunter, Jersey is our family companion.

This should be a very nice litter of Shorthairs with plenty of snap, crackle and pop; “Full Choke” noses; lots of style with high heads and high tails; medium to big going range and all the bidability and personality a person could ask for.

Dalin is OFA’d for Hips and Elbows and Jersey is OFA’d for Hips.
Pups are Guaranteed for Abilities, Temperament and against Genetic and Health defects.
Guarantee: http://almostheavengsps.netkennel.com/FolderView.asp?FolderID=137&mnuid=7380&HDR=Our%20Guarantee

$600.00
Pm or email me for contact info and questions.


by  AHGSP A few pix:


by  SD Pheasant Slayer Oh Bruce,

Here you go again trying to sell another litter of pups to poor unsuspecting hunters that aren’t properly prepared to hunt behind a dog of that quality. I just feel sick about the poor souls that won’t be able to sleep because when they close their eyes all they can see is a big ol’ fat rooster/grouse/quail exploding in front of their new rock-steady dog. I tell you what, being the humanitarian I am, I will take those pups off your hands and save you the trouble of getting rid of them. Why don’t you just swing north after picking up your two and deliver the remaining 9 to my place? I’ll even let you shoot a few SD roosters over Cash for all your trouble. heck, I’ll even throw in a hand-made crate to keep that wife of yours off your case for coming home empty handed. We may have to work out a deal to protect me from wife though, should I keep the whole group!

In all seriousness – for potential buyers out there – I can’t recommend Bruce and his dogs enough. He’s a genuine dog-man and is always willing to help out his customers with any training or other questions you might have (not that you’ll have many with the instincts he breeds into ‘em). I have a pup from Bruce and have been in touch with a couple other AHGSP owners and everyone has been thrilled.


by  AHGSP
There is absolutely nothing saying I couldn’t “get lost” on the way home and end up in SD! After all…. It’s not like I70 is a straight shot between MO and WV…. I took a wrong turn at Albuquerque… YEA! That’s it! That’s the ticket! Your on your own on your excuse!!!!

Thank you for the glowing endorsement. We try our best and I’ve never had a pup come back, though I’ve been tempted to “confiscate” more than a couple back, because I liked them so much! Jersey is one of them. I told Mike that if he wanted her back after I finished her up, he was going to have to drive to WV and get her!


by  MillerClemsonHD Alright now Bruce. If Heather see’s these pictures I’m in BIG trouble!! Like having Fin around here for Mae’s playmate isn’t good enough. Something about those solid livers makes them hard to resist. I have to keep telling her (and myself) Mae deserves to get her training and what not done before having to have another buddy at the house.

I will also just echo the statements already made here. Bruce works hard to put the best dogs out there he can and it shows. I am impressed everyday with my pup and if Bruce called me and said I have a pup for you that you do not want to turn down and would be a great compliment to the one I already have chances of me driving up to WV to get one are pretty high. Luckily it will be at least another year before we get a pup so I might be able to hold him off on this litter. I have seen Dalin run and he is a very impressive dog and chances are the next pup I get will come out of him.

If anyone wants some pictures of the pups out of Bruce’s last litter I have pics from 8 weeks up to about 6 mos (they are only 6 mos old) of them both in the field and around the house. I have a solid liver female and a friend of mine has a Liver and white Male from the same litter. I will be more than happy to pass along pictures or answer questions about the pups.


by  snips Yes, Dalin is a very nice boy…His littermate, my Dolly has her SH and a 4 pt major win in trials. Bruces Mollys littermates are doing great also. One littermate has a 1st in NSTRA already, and Ricks male, Pepper is getting ready for his SH this fall…These lines are as nice as it gets, for FT’s or Hunt tests, or if you choose to do some shows.


by  BrettBryan Brenda, does this dog have anything to do with Dale and Linda Garner? The reason I ask is the Dalin name.


by  snips Dale bred Dalin. His dam, Spice, Dale got from me, and Logan is the sire. Spices dam’s dam was bred by Dale and Linda, out of my old Rip.


by  BrettBryan got ya. I figured it had something to do with Dale and Linda because of the Dalin name.


by  daddyfid I have had the pleasure of running with Jersey in hunt tests over the last year. She is the dog that that normally has 2 or 3 finds per run, very intense on point, works the thick cover, has a medium range and TON of drive. I personally have heard 2 judges state that she is a great running dog and that she needs to also run in trials. The first time I saw her run was in a Hunting Dog Challenge about a year ago. It’s my understanding that this was her 1st competition that she was ever entered in and she earned 2nd place out of 63 dogs. I was invited to hunt over Jersey last fall and was very impressed on her hunting ability. She handled pheasants and quail flawlessly and retrieved every bird. If you are looking for a top notch bird dog you should look into this litter.

I think SD Pheasant Slayer needs to have Jersery and my dog come up and work some birds


by  HMiller Too late Doug…

Bruce if you “get lost” on your way home Mae would love a playmate (and I’ve already been thinking about names for our next pup…)! I was just looking at all the puppy pictures the other day… I can’t believe how much she has grown and what a great (bird) dog she is turning into! Look forward to seeing you in November!


by  AHGSP
Thanx all! We are expecting these to be some pretty dynamite pups!
They are 3 weeks old and growing like weeds. Starting to get around very well, starting on mush to substitute and for anyone that may make it out to the Heart of America GSP Club Hunt Test this weekend, see the Test Chair Mike or Secretary Renee if you would like to ask questions about the litter, Dam, etc… They are the owners of Jersey! Still just a couple pups available. Updated pictures can be seen here:
http://almostheavengsps.netkennel.com/PhotoAlbumView.asp?AlbumID=5448&HDR=3%20Week%20Pix!


by  Mike’s Jersey Hi there Bird Hunters,

Our pups will be 6 weeks old on Monday they are getting personality plus. We still have dogs available, they would make AWESOME Christmas presents.


by  Ditch__Parrot

Mike’s Jersey wrote:Hi there Bird Hunters,

Our pups will be 6 weeks old on Monday they are getting personality plus. We still have dogs available, they would make AWESOME Christmas presents.

Mike I sent you a pm


by  AHGSP Hey Mike and Renee! Bout time you signed up! You should go and introduce yourselves in the General Forum.

Pups were intro’d to birds at 5 weeks and to say they like them, may be an understatement!
These are going to be some great all around Shorthairs that will be capable of being successful in just about anything asked of them.

Pictures are updated to 5 weeks with Bird intro’s and Stack pix for a view of their build/structure at:
http://almostheavengsps.netkennel.com/PhotoAlbumView.asp?AlbumID=5397&HDR=Dalin%20and%20Jersey%20Litter%209-29-2008

We’ll be updating with the 6 week stack pix and some just goofing around/playing pix Tuesday or Wednesday.


by  Mike’s Jersey BIRD HUNTER’s,

The pups are 7 weeks old now. They are so playful, cute and very friendly.


by  Mike’s Jersey We still have pups available…..all the ones left are all liver with just a little smidge of white under the chest. 2 boys and 2 girls.


by  greatlawn Hi New to the forum. I just thought I would let everybody know that the pup I recieved from Mike is amazing. I have hunted over Jersey a lot she is a ROCKSTAR caliber dog. Don’t miss out on the chance to get a pup.


by  Mike’s Jersey Took some pictures of the few remaining pups that are for sale. You can see their natural insticts starting to kick in when they discovered the planted quail.


by  Mike’s Jersey Playing with birds


by  Mike’s Jersey These pups would make a great Christmas present!!!


by  Mike’s Jersey Last set of pictures. Wishing everyone a Happy Holiday.


by  Ditch__Parrot My latest pictures of Daisy May from this litter


by  greatlawn Check out the video of Jersey’s puppies. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OObTpBQkjrM


by  snips Looks like outstanding pups! Somebody outa snatch them up!!!


by  AHGSP These are some super nice pups! All I’ve seen and heard has been bold, confident and more bold and confident! The pup I’ve kept spends her days around the pigeon coop and Quail pen when she is not harassing her Daddy and the rest of my pack. Anyone looking for a pure bird dog through and through, really should contact me or Mike about the few remaining pups he has! I can’t say enough about how pleased I am with my pup at only 12 weeks! Additionally, as soon as Testing season starts out in the MO area, Mike plans to run Jersey for her SH. She was ready when she was bred, but was too close to whelping to attempt it before hand.


by  Mike’s Jersey Hey Everyone,

Spent Saturday in the nice weather working with the puppies, took some video of the pups.

Take a look, here’s the link.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=MikesJersey&search_type=&aq=f


by  Mike’s Jersey Good Morning,

We had a busy weekend at our house. Four of our puppies got good homes this past weekend. Now we only have one left, male, liver.


by  Mike’s Jersey Hey everyone just wanted to let all of you know that we took the puppies with us hunting this weekend to get them some fun in the sun on sunday.I have one liver male left,and like Bruce said when they were born these dogs have alot of drive!sorry I didn’t get any video this time.if we have any pics i will get them up later.Angus has had no problems riding in the dog box,an hour and a half drive both ways and no probs.He is also starting to point by scent on pigions and on quail i got for training.We are working on crate and house traing him and having good success,I’m sure he will make someone a great hunting companion.
Don’t let him get away.


by  greatlawn I just thought I would put a picture of Toby and my son on a pigeon. These are truly exceptional dogs. Toby is pointing from about 6 feet away.


by  Lance-CO This is Dot aka “Abby” pointing to a bird.

Angelo


by  greatlawn Check out Toby at 4 months. I believe there is still 1 solid liver male left.


by  Cashiers What pups are still available from this litter, if any?


by  Mike’s Jersey Pictures of Angus on Quail. He is still available.


by  MOOSE They are looking great!


by  h.q.s Lookin good! I have stayed caught up with those videos of them. Sure look like some nice pups!


by  Mike’s Jersey Thanks for the kind words everyone.Just to let everyone know Angus is the last one I have left,and he is house broke and crate trained ,he and very well behaived in the house ,as well he loves kids of any age.
I am working with him on “here,heal,and woa”,and he is very bidable .WE try to make sure he gets bird work 3 times a week.
I am just hoping that i can hind him a good hunting home.
PM me if anyone is interested some one will have a chance at a great companion
thanks to everyone Michael.


by  Lance-CO Mike,

I can’t say enough good things about my pup, Abby. Her deposition is awesome. I take her to my office everyday and people doesn’t even know I have Abby w/ me. In the field, she amazed my retrieve club members on how she naturally points and loves to retrieve dead birds. We are still working on coming back though but she is still young.

Angelo


by  BIGBOREBLASER Just wanted to share some updates of Rambo aka (Chip) and Briley aka (Misty). They are now 6 mo old and doing very well. They are very well behaved, obedient, and have a strong desire to hunt birds. Rambo entered his first field trial yesterday in the amateur division in West Virginia. His intensity shocked many people and they could not believe his is only 6 mo old. We are thrilled to have two great pups from Jersey and Dalin. I have attached some recent pictures below… Enjoy!

Rambo and Briley

Rambo on point

Briley on point

Here’s our 7 yr old weimaraner and the pups when they were 4mo old


by  Lance-CO Just want to post a couple of pictures of one of the pup from this litter. This is Abby previous aka “Dot”

Abby w/ my lab Pick

Abby pointing w/ style

Abby pointing again


by  MillerClemsonHD Great pictures, I have been hoping to see some pics from this litter soon and hear how they were doing. My wife tries to steal Muddy from Bruce every time we go see him.

Bruce how do you get these little liver girls to look so much alike???? Not the same litter but out of the same lines.

This one is one of my favorites. She actual curls her lip frequently

Even have the same ear flip up on point!


by  Ditch__Parrot Good to see recent pics of Abby. I’ll share of few of Daisy May. Most were taken a couple weeks ago. Sorry most recent I have. I’ll try to get the photographer to go with me to take some training pics to post.

I know that tennis ball is around here somewhere

No, don’t point at it…. Pick it up and bring it here.. silly girl

Thats more like it

Couch Tater

Unfortunately with her being such a quick little squirt most of our picks of her come out like this

An older one

Her first point of a covey of wild quail !! She really loves quail.

Picking up a single

That sure is a nice looking girl of MillerClemsonHD’s. They do all kind of look the same, don’t they.


by  HMiller The pups are looking great! I love the pic of Daisy May on the couch… Mae used to sleep on the back of the couch like that… now she’s just taken over the couch!

It is crazy how they all look alike… we love our solid liver girl and I go back and forth on whether I want anything other than solid liver, but Muddy is pretty darn cute… Bruce still hasn’t taken me up on my offer to puppy sit when Mae is up there for “camp”!


by  Ditch__Parrot Bruce…Lets see some pics of Muddy..

A few more. Same day. Better camera, better photographer.


by  Ruffshooter I don’t know if you ever will do that breeding again but if I can not get my Mercy bred I would be interested. That one with the flipped over ear is almost I dentical to Mercy. By description seems to have similar attributes.

Very Nice all.
Rick


by  nwMOgsp I have been extremely pleased with my pup so far (Angus), and his training is coming along well. Right now I am working lots of hours, plus I have two small kids at home, so Angus is with a pro trainer. Every time I talk to him, he comments on how quickly he is picking everything up, and how well he is doing overall. His temperament is also great – the kids love him to death, and ask almost daily if we can go get him yet.

Jason


by  AHGSP Awesome to see all the pix of the pups as they’ve been growing!

I’ll get some pix of Muddy up this weekend if I can get a few new ones of her in the field.

Jason,
If I may, who do you have Angus with?


by  nwMOgsp Bruce,

Angus is with Les Simon (The Gun Dog School of Missouri) in Cosby, MO - http://www.gundogofmo.com/.

Jason


1st for me!

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=24868

by  snips Few days ago I was at pigeon coop and Rick was training in the field..Birds were flying in…While I was walking around a pigeon landed on my shoulderJust sat there while I was getting feed………….


by  postoakshorthairs just be happy it didn’t use you as an outhouse!


by  ezzy333

snips wrote:Few days ago I was at pigeon coop and Rick was training in the field..Birds were flying in…While I was walking around a pigeon landed on my shoulder Just sat there while I was getting feed………….

My young birds never do that but the older breeding pairs will land on my head or shoulders or whatever they deem as handy when I go in to feed them. Kind of neat really. But it is a surprise the first time it happens.

Ezzy


by  snips I was not even inside. These white pigeons I bought from a left over club event to add some color…They might be somewhat more domesticated than mine are. They have been great to raise, very guarding parents. It was a surprise tho. He just stood on my shoulder while I moved around….


Hawk+pigeon

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=10511

by  bean1031 I was driving home from sonic today when off to the side of the road in a feild I saw a hawk circling around about 30ft off the ground. Right from under it a piegeon or a dove took off. The hawk closed its wings and dove! The bird only got about 5 ft. and then WAM! It was like a line backer nailing an old lady!


by  Dennmor Was watching one of the Birddogs Forever shows on line. This one had a guy who hunts pheasants with two setters and a hawk! Can’t remember what kind of hawk but it was large. Anyway the dogs would go on point and hold until the Hawk could gain enough height. Then the bird was flushed and the hawk dove in for the kill. Quite interesting.


by  Grange This past fall while my parents were on vacation I was taking care of his pigeons. As I was getting ready to let them out I looked out the back window and saw a hawk sitting in a tree immediately behind the pigeon coop. The birds didn’t get to stretch their wings that day.


by  dog dr if you keep pigeons long enough and fly them once in a while, the hawks will find you…. and your pigeons.


by  markj Where I work used to be a wetland area. Was here in the summer saw a hawk take a pigion out of the air. Some gals started yelling at the hawk he lets the pigion go hawk catches it again and off he goes with it. I said nothing like fresh meat


by  natetnc as i mentioned a couple weeks ago, i was launching quail out of a launcher for my pup and letting my buddies older dog play clean up. before we could get his dog out to play clean up a hawk had already got to one of them.


by  luke0927 .22 mag….what hawk?


by  V-John

luke0927 wrote:.22 mag….what hawk?

Then this happens to you.

Undercover… You kidding me?

http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/us/200 … killer.cnn


by  Casper Recently I had 2 hawks in my coop after I was gone for a week. I came home to a Red Tail and a Falcon in my coop. They killed 3 of my best birds. Total they killed 6 birds. Even though they killed those 3 good ones they weren’t so special that I needed to kill the predator. It was sure neat though to see those birds up close. They are allot smaller than they appear.

If you plan on raising pigeons you have to plan on casualties. I have had hawks try and take out my birds just out of the remote releasers.

FWIW


Tethering/hobbling pigeons

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=89&t=1303

by  Casper I am new here and I have a situation. I have started my own pigeon coop. The birds were puchased from a guy that raced them. All the info I have read informs me that I will have to wait till I have reared some chicks that will know of no other place to fly back to other than my coop. So what I would like to know is if any of you know how to tether a pigeon so it can take flight just far enough to be out of sight of my pup so we can work up to another bird. This way a helper or myself can retrieve the birds to use again another day. I dont have wild pigeons or a game bird farm near by so I am having to make do with what I have.
Casper


by  TAK Casper what you are talking about is reffered to as Carding a bird. How I do it is I get a good health pigion, sounds as if you have that. I will attach a piece of yarn to a piece of card board and then to one leg of the bird. I use a slip knot or something along the lines of that(no Boy Scout)Some people dizzy the bird a bit before release some don’t. THe wind and the air drag of the card board tires the bird out a bit and will sit, but also be ready to take fight again when you work the dog to it. When I am training this way the dog is always on a check cord. Most offen the bird will react to the dog.
Also pick your training area wisely. Tall busy places and lot of tangle areas is not a good Idea.


by  snips One more thing. I don` know about pigeons that have been raced, but I thought if you kept a pigeon a month or two, any pigeon would home back to you. I have adult pigeons given to me that I keep up awhile then I train them to my coop.


by  Country-Side Breeders Racing pigeons will always return to their original destination. You can keep them for years and they will still head back to where they came from if left free. And a lot times, if the previous owner gets his “bad” birds back, they get rather upset. I’ve been on both sides of the track…we used to race them when I was young.


by  Ayres Another problem: If you have flocks of wild pigeons around where you live (like I do) then it doesn’t matter if you keep young pigeons in your coop all winter long, they’ll eventually hook up with the wild ones and never come back.


by  Country-Side Breeders Yep.


by  Casper Tak
how long should the yarn be and how big a peice of card board. how far will a pigeon fly.
Thank you. You killed tow birds with one stone I was going to ask what carding was!


by  TAK

Country-Side Breeders wrote:Racing pigeons will always return to their original destination. You can keep them for years and they will still head back to where they came from if left free. And a lot times, if the previous owner gets his “bad” birds back, they get rather upset. I’ve been on both sides of the track…we used to race them when I was young.

Not always true…. I have a pair that was given to me. They have papers on them and range in price from $400 dollars a bird! I left them in the coop for about 4 weeks and they produced one egg. I was told to break it and they would produce 2 next time I did this and true to fact 2 eggs. Momma bird is sitting 2 eggs and I use both to work dogs and both returned every time…….. So far so good!


by  TAK

Casper wrote:Tak
how long should the yarn be and how big a peice of card board. how far will a pigeon fly.
Thank you. You killed tow birds with one stone I was going to ask what carding was!

8 or so inches. Not to long so there is not mcuh to tangle around bushes. Just work with it and see what works for you…..


by  Country-Side Breeders

TAK wrote:Not always true…. I have a pair that was given to me. They have papers on them and range in price from $400 dollars a bird! I left them in the coop for about 4 weeks and they produced one egg. I was told to break it and they would produce 2 next time I did this and true to fact 2 eggs. Momma bird is sitting 2 eggs and I use both to work dogs and both returned every time…….. So far so good!

You’re right…they won’t leave if they’re sitting on a nest. Sometimes it’s hard enough just to get them to leave to do cleaning!


by  Small Munsterlander Casper: Here is a version of Tak’s suggestion with a little more detail. It is taken from a document I wrote for my clients a number of years ago.

Disked Birds:

Disked birds are a term I have coined for a technical modification I have created to the “carded” bird technique used to make non-covey or non-homing training birds recyclable. Not everyone has access to wild birds whenever certain training sessions are called for in the development of your bird dog. Not everyone can house homing pigeons or set up a recall pen situation yet wants the benefit of a “soft” planted bird that will flush as close to wild. Hampering the birds ability to fly very far yet be able to get up without hindrance, as a wild bird would, are great benefits to a trainer. Trainers for decades have been creating drag and using gravity to fatigue different bird species (quail, chukar and pigeons) so the bird could simulate the flush of a wild bird yet is recoverable for future reuse. The common method was to use cardboard in the shape of a rectangle of approximately 8”X12” dimensions to create this drag and weight. All materials have limitations and I found cardboard to be easily affected by water (rain or ponds) and too easily bent therefore loosing the drag benefit offered from a flat resistant surface. I also experienced the square corners snagging more often than what I perceived a round or disk shape might. I became aware of a material called Coraplast years ago which researching materials to use for solving various challenges in housing and transporting my hawks, falcons and owls. Coraplast is simply a “plastic” corrugated cardboard. It is much more durable than cardboard yet possesses approximately the same weight. Combining the durability of the Coraplast with a less snag resistant shape (circular) I hit upon a modification that seems superior to the one of old.

I made a few other small modifications that aid in the use of this “system”. Obviously the disks can be created in any practical size. Quail need less drag and gravity to bring them back to ground than pigeons. So I cut disk of 4”, 6”, 8”, and 12” and place a 3/8” hole in the center of all except a few of the 4” disks. These 4” disks I call my base disks and they have a 12” line (any longer increases the risk of tangling on equipment or low bushes yet doesn’t increase the effect of the system) fastened to the center of the disk using a small hole and simple knot to create a size that cannot be pulled back through the center hole. At the other end of the line I attach a quick opening fishing swivel. The reason for the fishing swivel? To reduce tangling and improve attachment ease to the bird’s leg. Many a potential training bird has escaped while the trainer is attempting to “tie” the string to the bird. When the training session is over and the bird recovered removed of the disk system is also very easy because of the clip-fastening portion of the fishing swivel. Because of the holes in the larger sized disks a larger disk (if needed) can be slipped over the line to increase drag and weight. One final modification I implemented was the use of brightly colored Coraplast. This aids in locating the down bird and yet seems to be more difficult for the dogs to see while the bird is planted or in the launcher.

Disked birds can be used in combination with launchers but care should be taken to have a training area devoid of trees that may allow the bird to roost out of reach or worse yet get hung up for a most disrespectful death.

William L. Dove © Copyright 1999-05 Owner and Operator of Lonesome Dove’s Kennel, Lonesome Dove’s Training Diary and Lonesome Dove’s Discussion Group.


by  gunner Bill,

Do you use modified falconers jessies to attach the swivel and line to the birds leg?
And do you attach to one leg or both?
Thanks


by  Small Munsterlander Gunner: I don’t but one could. Rather than jesses I would use a design of anklet with a very small gromet hole if I thought that was necessary. Pigeons are quite dirty birds so I would think anything semi-perminently attached to their tarsas would likely get filthy. Some falconers flying small raptors like kestrels, merlins, coopers and sharpies use a snap closure/leather anklet system that is removable after hunting. This system might have value.

The use of a pair of lines going to each tarsas or a short “V” structure would certainly reduce what little stress is applied. However, this benifit needs to be weighted against the risk of hangup based on the type of habitat in the training area.

I train often in areas with small bushes so like many “modifiers” I created this tool to reflect those conditions. If a person trains in very open habitat they don’t need to be as concerned about hangups.

If any of this doesn’t make sense I can make some drawings and post them but if you have some association with a falconer or group they can further explain the above.

Out of necessity falconers become resoursefull so the limiting factor will be your creativity. I would be interested in hearing back if you design a useful modification to this system. Bill


Raccoon Ranglers?

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=4026

by  crittercontrol Had the pleasure of taking 12 Volt Man along with me “crittering” the other day.

Got a call for a “Raccoon in the Chimney,” and upon closer inspection we found two raccoons in the chimney flue, 1 Blond, the other standard issue brown.

I push them up the flue, while 12 Volt man is ready for the capture. Success!

Boy was she mad! Pretty rare find though….

The other pops out the flue.

But we narrowly miss him!

Just another day….


by  GSP4619 Oh man some has to do it LOL. You never got bit did you?


by  gr_elliott I have much respect for a person that does that for a living. I few months ago I had a squrial in the wall and called my pest controll buddy out to help me. It is a long story so i just copied it and pasted it from an email I had sent

==============================
What a night last night was, wild squirrel in my wall, drunk pest control guy, and Harper trying to talk us into just letting the squirrel out to run wild in the house so he can kick it.

It all started last weekend I was in the house and hear something running around in the attic. I knew it had to be a squirrel, they are all over the place around my house, just begging to get shot and eating all my bird food. Every time I heard his little “bleep” running around I grabbed the broom and beat on the ceiling, and would crawl into the attic and flash my light around to see if I could see him. I did this a few times and noise stopped. I thought great, they left, now all I have to do is get a tall ladder and close up any sort of opening.

Tuesday night rolls around and we are eating dinner, when all the sudden I hear something in the wall by the kitchen trying to claw its way out. I had no idea what to do at that point, so I said forget it and watched some TV and went to bed. Wednesday he is still in the wall so I call my buddy Ryan the pest control guy to help out.

He shows up on Thursday around 4:30 to get this thing out. He immediately goes to the fridge and grabs a beer, we sit around and BS and we drink one. After that he crawled up in the attic and looked down the wall and sure enough he could see the squirrel. It was all hunkered down and almost dead, barely breathing. We did not want to cut a hole in the wall, so I asked him if he had something that we could stick down the wall stab the squirrel with and pull it out. Of course it is not that easy, he had nothing, I thought it was strange that the pest control guy had nothing like this.

Then I came up with a “great” idea. I said hey man I have a fishing pole over there, we can put a treble hook on it and try to hook him and reel him up, he is almost dead, so he should not fight that much. Surprisingly Ryan thought this was a good idea, we rigged up the fishing pool and he went in the attic again. Oh yeah, after like 2 more beers. He was kinda worried at first about what that squirrel was going to do if he did hook it. Me being the good friend said hey don’t worry about it, that is a 7’ rod, just make sure you hook him good. Well he tried to hook him and the squirrel did not move, but Ryan could not get it hooked. That idea was busted.

He drank a couple more beers and then it was time to do the only thing left, cut the wall. That turned out to be a task in itself, we broke all the blades on the jig saw and he had to go to Lowe’s to get more. Of course after one more beer.

He finally gets the wall open and he pokes in there with a wire to try and locate the squirrel. This went on for like 30 minutes when all the sudden the squirrel came to life and came springing out of the hole, he slammed the cabinet doors so that it would not get loose in the house. That is when it was decided that we need to kill this thing, so out came the pellet gun. We opened up the cabinet and Ryan had the pellet gun ready to shot. After 15 min of poking Mr Squirrel showed his face again and he got popped in the chest. Harper was holding the flashlight and ran like a little girl; Ryan is scream “give me the GD light”. It was real tense for like 10 seconds waiting to see what was going to happen. Then Ryan’s cell phone starts ringing and vibrating in his back pocket, and he went crazy. He thought that squirrel was going up his “bleep”. It was funny, and a good reason to drink another beer.

Ryan went to stick his hand in the wall to grab the squirrel and it bit him, turns out he was not dead. It did not break the skin though, he was wearing gloves. The poking went on for I bet 30 more minutes before the rodent showed his face again, this time he caught a pellet in the forehead….done. We got him out, it took 3 hours, and I bet Ryan drank a 12 pack by himself in that timeframe.

After it is all said and done, Ryan said, “I have never done this, I just spray for bugs”. Dude has never even done this before, guess he found one more field to work in thanks to me.

=================================

sorry to hijack, just thought this was funny…..


by  Ryan Rob you sissy why didnt you grab him with your hands

Never seen a blonde one. I bet you 2 had fun.


by  GSP4619 LMAO good story.


by  GSPinROCH All I have to say is The Great Outdoors with Dan Akyroyd and John Candy LMAO and hearing stories like that reminds me of that movie with the bat and the coons and oh man!


by  Greg Jennings Was playing volleyball with friends in Granbury, TX when I lived in Ft. Worth.

Ball went down a culvert, I went in on elbows and toes after it. Found myself facing a racoon. It was *huge* and very pissed off.

I think I still hold the world record for the 20 yard backwards elbows and knees sprint.

Best,


by  Vizsla Vince That’s pretty wild (no pun intended)! I didn’t know racoons came in blonde! The only animals I run into @ work are already dead & either cooked or puree’d.


by  GSP4619 LOL


by  Wagonmaster We had one “unzip” a dog in about six seconds, during a hunting trip back in the 60′s. Opened the belly right up. Fortunately, had a surgeon in the party. Fixed back at the car with a needle and thread until we could get to the vet.


by  mit OMG! I never knew they could be that nasty.


by  ezzy333 You sure that wasn’t a badger. Coons normally fight on top while a badger lays on its back and will cut a dog to ribbons. Also badgers are normally den in a a good cover field. Just seems like the work of a badger from how you describe it.

Ezzy


by  Wagonmaster Yes, it was in a swamp and we saw it. Racoon. The dog and coon got into it and the coon just opened the dog up. Fairly large one. You are right, they usually like to get up on the head and take the eyes out. Which also happened to a friend some years back. One-Eyed Jack became the dog’s name.

Not a thing to play with.


by  GSP4619 OMG I did not know either they are that crazy. That is realy scary.


by  mountaindogs

Greg Jennings wrote:Was playing volleyball with friends in Granbury, TX when I lived in Ft. Worth.

Ball went down a culvert, I went in on elbows and toes after it. Found myself facing a racoon. It was *huge* and very pissed off.

I think I still hold the world record for the 20 yard backwards elbows and knees sprint.

Best,

LOL, that I would like to see

I used to do wildlife rehab and the spouse did wildlife damage control so we’ve both had our fair share of racoons too close! Tough little critters, I still have a couple of scars from a baby a few weeks past weaning!! I am sure he thrived cause he was a mean mean little thing. A good thing in Rehab, but


by  Greg Jennings

mountaindogs wrote:

Greg Jennings wrote:Was playing volleyball with friends in Granbury, TX when I lived in Ft. Worth.

Ball went down a culvert, I went in on elbows and toes after it. Found myself facing a racoon. It was *huge* and very pissed off.

I think I still hold the world record for the 20 yard backwards elbows and knees sprint.

Best,

LOL, that I would like to see

I used to do wildlife rehab and the spouse did wildlife damage control so we’ve both had our fair share of racoons too close! Tough little critters, I still have a couple of scars from a baby a few weeks past weaning!! I am sure he thrived cause he was a mean mean little thing. A good thing in Rehab, but

I’d heard the jokes about climbing up in a tree to shake a racoon out when coon hunting (“shoot up here, one of us has got to have some relief!”), but being in a narrow culvert with one brought it too close to home.

We’ve had problems with them catching Huns that we had in a pigeon coop. 6 huns in one night. We put the traps out and caught 3 racoons in two nights, then another within a week. Tricky little rascals.

Best,


by  grant

Greg Jennings wrote:Was playing volleyball with friends in Granbury, TX when I lived in Ft. Worth.

Ball went down a culvert, I went in on elbows and toes after it. Found myself facing a racoon. It was *huge* and very pissed off.

I think I still hold the world record for the 20 yard backwards elbows and knees sprint.

Best,

lol


by  LuLu_01 Years ago, a friend of mine had a racoon in their garage. The animal control guy got it with his pole. I’ll tell you what, that the the scarriest things. That racoon surely would have ripped anything open at that point.

Since then, I avoid encountering one at all costs.

Had a possum up in a blue spruce tree here one night. My GSP was outside and started “Screaming”, thought for sure she was caught on something or hurt very badly.

Had to grab a flashlight and run, she was behind the waterfall of the pond, under the blue spruce (branches are cut up about 5ft because of the waterfall). She had something “tree’d, I didn’t want to go under the tree to get her, figured a coon was in it. She was screaming so much, the neighbors were starting to come out to find out what was wrong. The dog is very quiet normally…what a sound to behold.

I was able to see what was in the tree, a possum, I really didn’t want to get under that either but finally got the dog..without incident.

Guess when our dogs are potentially threatened or hurt…we’ll do just about anything!!


Pigeons and coop design

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=9080

by  bobman can you folks post good links or personal pictures of coop designs and give a good description of the process of establishing a homing pigeon coop system that will provide birds for training purposes for a year or more.


by  AceofSpades41 Bobman

For me I used the plans from the following link http://www.redroselofts.com/starter_loft.htm. The loft is 4 x 8 x 8 and it will hold up to 17 birds comfortably.

For me my current batch of birds I got as culls never been flown and I’ve basically locked them up for the past 6 weeks giving them access to the aviary in the front this allowed them to get their bearings. I then open the loft door and let them explore.

Right now their at the 5 mile radius, eventually will get them out to 50 miles as my training area is 35 miles out. Including some pics.

Hope this gives you a starting point.


by  luke0927 please do…i need to turn my quail Johnny house into a pigeion coop and i need some ideas….I think ill take a pic and get some thoughts from people on here.

edit…

I see ACE’s post i did not know you could get them to come back from that far. Do you just take them down the road let them out and let htem come back….just working your way out to farther distances?


by  ohiogsp http://www.gundogforum.com/forum/viewto … ght=pigeon

http://www.gundogforum.com/forum/viewto … ght=pigeon

http://www.gundogforum.com/forum/viewto … ght=pigeon


Pigeons in close quarters?

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=89&t=17002

by  Jta Hey all
First time poster, and I just wanted to say how much I liked the website. I have a question though. What do you guys think about having a pigeon coop close to the dog. I have a medium sized backyard where my gsp spends a lot of his time during the day. I would like to get my own pigeons to continue doing hunting training with him. However, I don’t know what having pigeons so close to him would do to his drive or training in the field. What are your thoughts? Thanks.


by  Sprig I have a pigeon coop 10 feet away from my dogs and the only down side is occasionly a dog will bark at the birds but that usually is short lived with only new dogs. once they get used to the birds the dog usually settles down.
it wont bother the birds at all.


by  windswept I occasionally buy pigeons from a guy who has three GSPs living in the yard with his three coops. So I went ahead and set my coop up in the exercise yard I use for my dogs. It’s only been a few months but so far my pigeon guy was right. No problem for the dogs.
The one problem I have is this. My coop is about 6 inches off the ground and has a mesh floor. ALOT of pigeon feed ends up on the ground and my dogs have been pulling food and droppings out from under the coop and eating it. So when I’m cleaning kennels I have been seeing quite abit of bird seed in the dog’s waste. I took advantage of the warm weather we are having these last few days and put down a solid floor in the coop. That should solve my problem.


by  Jta What about if the dog could literally jump up and see the birds? Nose on the glass so to speak. I don’t really have a better spot to put the coop, but I guess I could fence it off, but I don’t really want to if I don’t need to.


by  GsPJustin I was always told that it would make the dogs want the birds more… But heck, what do I know!


by  Rick Hall

Jta wrote:What about if the dog could literally jump up and see the birds? Nose on the glass so to speak. I don’t really have a better spot to put the coop, but I guess I could fence it off, but I don’t really want to if I don’t need to.

My dogs have, for decades now, been able to get eyeball to eyeball with our penned birds without need to jump, whether the homer loft in our yard, the quail pen I kept under an office window (to evesdrop on their small talk), or the pheasant, chukar and quail pens right next to their kennels at the lodge. No problems whatsoever. My only concern in your case would be a loft design that precludes break-ins if the dog is left with it unsupervised. Once Pup learns he can’t get at your yard birds, he’ll little doubt quit paying much attention to them there. Yet, he’ll still be as driven as ever to work them in other context.


by  Jta I am positive that my dog can not get into the pigeon coop. It was made strong enough to keep a dog out. All the openings are up high except for the door which is secure. You can walk inside the cage.


by  Nebraska My coop is in my yard and not fenced off. As you can see from the pics, the dogs will do laps around the coop which has made a mud doughnut around the coop now…. They don’t bother the birds and, IMO, it’s kind of like HDTV for dogs……

If the birds are making a lot of commotion inside the coop, both dogs will tend to pay attention to the coop….

My youngest will check out the coop and go about her business (notice the ball in her mouth) if the birds aren’t doing much. On the other hand, my oldest GSP will head to the coop as soon as she goes out and pretty much stay right there until we get her to come in. At times, it’s almost impossible to pull her away from the coop (even when it’s raining for bitterly cold) because she’s so focused on the birds.


Pigeon vs. Quail

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=89&t=21705

by  surferdave I recently built a pigeon coop. Now that I’m looking into getting my hands on pigeons, I found a person that sells breeding pairs of quail. For training purposes, which would work better? Is it easier to get pigeon to breed than quail? What is your experiences regarding this. My coop is 4X4X4 with shelves for nesting and “sunroom” with wire mesh. Can quail even be housed like this? I always see them in enclosures that incorporate the ground so they can run around.

David.


by  surferdave Oh, one more thing. Can pigeons and quail be housed together successfully? Thanks.


by  mudhunter The quail will not breed. They will Lay eggs that you can remove and incubate yourself but the Quail will not hatch their own eggs in the pen. Pigeons will do it all by themselves. As far as whats better for training I prefer quail but they only work if you can can train within a few hundred yards of the pen. Pigeons you can train miles away from the coop. Don’t know about housing them together, never tried it.


by  mm I have put them togther with no problem.


by  surferdave Thanks for the advice. Sounds like I’ll have better luck breeding pigeon with the environment I have right now. I guess if I need quail for planting later down the line, I can just purchase them individually.


by  birddog1968

mudhunter wrote:The quail will not breed. They will Lay eggs that you can remove and incubate yourself but the Quail will not hatch their own eggs in the pen. Pigeons will do it all by themselves. As far as whats better for training I prefer quail but they only work if you can can train within a few hundred yards of the pen. Pigeons you can train miles away from the coop. Don’t know about housing them together, never tried it.

If you can incubate eggs than the quail obviously bred…….They may or may not set tho…..Alot of folks will use Bantam chickens to set quail eggs or an incubator..


by  surferdave So strange, is there a reason the quail will lay them but not set on them till they hatch? Maybe it’s not a comfortable environment for them to raise their young?

David


by  wems2371 I was told that domesticated quail just aren’t smart enough or have enough instincts left in them. My quail would lay huge nests of eggs, and then they’d scratch them all out of the nest and start over, never sitting on any of them long enough for a hatch. I got two young bantam hens this fall, that I’m looking forward to trying out next year. I have a friend who has done this very successfully.


Pigeon coup design and placement

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=12000

by  Nebraska I’d like to build a new pigeon coup for keeping homers & shooters for training and would like some input on the design and where to locate the loft.

We have fenced in backyard (chain-link) and I’d like to put the loft in the corner of our yard so it’s away from the house and was wondering if this would be a problem for A) the birds due to the elements (out in the open) or B) for my pup (getting used to the smell).

We back up to a creek and have decent neighbors so I could probably place the loft right outside the fence in the common area if I had too but I’d rather have it in our yard if at all possible.

Any experience/input on the loft design and placement would be much appreciated…..and thanks in advance!


by  Rick Hall Sharing a yard with your loft should have no influence your dog’s reaction to the birds outside their loft. (I’ve had a loft in my yard for years, and my dogs’ kennels at the lodge are all of thirty feet from our preserve bird pens.)

As for dealing with the elements, pigeons are hardy birds, but the loft shown below was designed for South Louisiana, and if I went with something similar in the North, I’d want removeable shutters over most of the wire in winter. The Redrose type lofts found at link I’ve included might roast birds here, but are apparently fine in cooler climates.

In any event, here are a couple of my posts on loft design from another board:

I’m the Goldilocks of pigeon lofts.

My first (the corner of a livestock shed) was much too big, and I fed a whole lot more homers than necessary, did a whole lot more clean-up than necessary, had a whole lot more trouble catching the particular birds I wanted than necessary, and took a whole lot more health risk than necessary.

So I downsized my second loft dramatically to a small walk-in accommodating six breeding pairs with just a 4′x4′ footprint. It was designed with ease of maintenance in mind and had a grated floor, which needed shoveled out from under just a couple times a year and was a big step up from shoveling, sweeping and shoveling the first one every little whip-stitch. And I no longer needed to chase a particular bird I wanted, as all could be reached with little movement. But it didn’t comfortably house as many reserve birds as I might wish to keep, took pains to get in and out of without letting birds slip out, and raised concerns about the health risk of breathing the “dust” the birds and routine cleaning kicked up in that small, relatively confined space.

Loft three, which I find “just right,” is another walk-in with a grated floor and that’s also designed to accommodate six breeding pairs, but I increased the footprint to 4′x6′, which holds more birds, gives them plenty room to move away from the door when I enter and exit, and affords much more ventilation, while still offering sufficient shelter from the elements and allowing easy capture of any particular bird I wish. And it was built of treated lumber and metal siding, so rather than stirring potentially hazardous “dust’ while cleaning, I can simply hose all but the nest boxes out. Aside from periodically emptying those next boxes, maintenance is down to hosing out the loft and shoveling the droppings out from under it just twice a year.

Please know I am not trying to suggest that my loft should or would suit anyone else’s needs, but am only presenting some considerations I’ve found important. Be back in a while to post some pics and speak to some small refinements I’ve found useful, but in the meantime, here is a link showing a very popular loft design, how to build it and lofts a number of others have built beginning with that basic design: PIGEON LOFT LINK

and:

Round two, some photos and “Why?s”:

Under construction:

Aside from showing the raised grate floor, hose-proof framing and nest box design, the most important thing this shot shows is the placement of the loft’s return trap. It is too far from portions of the loft varmints (and pets) can climb for them to reach and enter it, and it is on a side of the loft that shields it from the view of prey birds perched in the large oaks overlooking the loft. Hawks and owls most definitely do sit and study the birds through the loft’s ventilation wire, but none, to date, has solved the riddle of getting at them in the loft.

Here’s the highly sophisticated locking system for the trap’s hinged outside perch/door, an inverted sliding bolt:

There’s also an inside lock for the trap’s bobs provided by a rod that can be run through holes near the bottom of the doors frame or through holes near its top to hold the bobs up, as shown here:

A front view during construction:

And the finished loft:

This one shows how the loft is ventilated (maybe not such a good thing in cold climates but great down here) and the small door that allows access to the area under the nesting boxes that can be used to service feeders, waterers and the nesting material bin without disturbing the rest of the loft.

The nesting area:

Since one of my goals is maximum reproduction from a minimum of breeding pairs, I make it as easy as possible for the highly territorial birds to almost always have two sets of young (squabs and new eggs) going at the same time by providing well divided, easily defensible duplex nest boxes that eliminate time and effort otherwise wasted squabbling over nest sites.

One of the “duplexes”:

This shot shows my drop-down-for-cleaning nest box fronts. The bottom of each clean box is lined with a double layer of waxed paper (that doesn’t trap moisture like some materials) topped with a paper plate to keep the birds from tearing it up. That lets me lift virtually all of the two or three crap-cemented nests that are taken out with each cleaning free of the box in one lump that leaves little behind.

Our nesting material bin:

Pine needles are the best nesting material I’ve found, and a simple wire bin such as this lets the birds get what they need without as much waste as other methods of offering it might create.

Inverted “V” perches help keep ‘em from crapping on each other:

Again, what works for me may not suit the next person’s needs at all, but after ten years of having pigeons and three years with this last loft, I’m not anxious to change a thing. Think I finally got it right.


by  brittfans living in omaha you might consider keeping it close to a power source.In the winter its nice to to keep the waterer on a heater.My coop also sits on a concret pad if not my dogs would wear a hole to china trying to get a peak at the birds.


by  ohiogsp The red rose lofts are soem of the bst small lofts out there. Here is a link to some post I made about mine. There is a link to the red rose site on the first link of mine.

http://www.gundogforum.com/forum/viewto … highlight=

http://www.gundogforum.com/forum/viewto … highlight=


by  Nebraska As usual….great responses!! I appreciate the info and links and will take a look at my back yard to see where the coop would work best this weekend.

Also, we get some pretty good snow and thunderstorms around here. How do these coops hold up in strong wind? Other than a heater on the water, is there anything else I should consider? Would it be beneficial to have some kind of storm cover for the front mesh area or will the blowing snow/rain not be an issue?

BTW – ohiogsp, that is one sharp lookin’ GSP in your avatar!! What’s his story??


by  Rick Hall Though I’d not mentioned it above, my loft is, in fact, anchored – and survived Hurricane Rita, which a lot of area structures didn’t. (Was a family joke that we should evacuate to the pigeon loft.)

The birds love rain in decent weather, and will crowd the wire to bask in it, and the nesting boxes have never, to my knowledge gotten wet. But, as noted above, I’d want to add removable panels over most of the wire if harsh winters were a concern.


by  ezzy333 Here in the North I would have it enclosed in the winter. My loft is totally enclosed with 4 south facing windows that can be opened and then I usean outdoor avary for the summer months. I do have the ridge roll vents and 4 closeable vents at floor level.

Ezzy


by  luke0927 I need to place my johnny house converted to a pigeon coop….i used to keep it on the edge of one of my training fields but the everytime we are at the field they want to go to it and have peak(at least when the quail were in it)….i have open places on my property to put it and wooded places i would think out in the open would be better as it would give them more protection from hawks sitting on a limb just waiting to swoop one up…thoughts?


by  Rick Hall Before I got a handle on avoiding hawk losses, the great majority of mine took place under large trees.


by  ohiogsp Yes, the more open the better for hawks. You can make a fold open door on the front of my style loft. I usually cover the front section of mine with plastic in the winter. I also put 2×4′s to the ground from the aviaryies of mine cause I had one flip one time. This has stoped it so far. The dog in my avatar is my dog B.A. he is a very nice dog. He has a Senior hunter title. He got that title in 4 of 5 runs. He had a very bad call in the one he failed. I am sure I could get a master on him now but havent been doing any tests for a long time. He comes from local hunting lines but one of the best NSTRA dogs in the county come from some of those same lines. He is awelsome on wild birds and probably the best dog I will ever own.


by  smackerquacker Here is my bird pen that I worked on over the weekend.

3000 gallon capacity, about 9′ tall and 8′ diameter. I have not done anything with the interior yet, or put in the trap door. I am open to suggestions. I thought about dividing it a little and having some quail in there as well. I will need to get some interior photos. Obviously this may be an eyesore if I lived in town. I drilled about 10 1″ holes in the bottom for any water to drain out and am thinking about a trap door or something so I can just hose it out. There are 5 of those windows, 9″ x 18″ and the fill hole on top is about 18″ in diameter to allow ventilation. I save the cutouts and could easily put in a few in cold weather.


by  sjohnny

Rick Hall wrote:Sharing a yard with your loft should have no influence your dog’s reaction to the birds outside their loft. (I’ve had a loft in my yard for years, and my dogs’ kennels at the lodge are all of thirty feet from our preserve bird pens.)

Wish I’d read this before I relocated a 7′x7′ garden shed to the other side of my property last week. I’m planning to convert it into a bird house and didn’t want it in a side yard to which the dog has access. Oh well, you live and learn.

John


by  Nebraska Is there an ideal direction to face a coop here in the midwest??

Ideally, I’d like to face the coop SW so the birds would be facing the field behind our house but this would get the brunt of our thunderstorms as well….


by  brittfans The birds like the most sun they can get.South to south east would be better but they are a tough bird and they should addapt.


by  Nebraska Thanks. If you’re coop’s working out well, would you mind if I took a peek??


I just got my first real gun dog….. now what?

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=89&t=26247

by  wills1235 I just moved to Eastern Washington. I’ve made a good friend and we hunt over his German Wirehairs. I’ve been searching for a GSP and my fiancee reserved me a puppy for my birthday. I haven’t trained a dog in 10 years. I really want to do right by my first GSP (my dream dog) and have many, many great hunts, as well as a great companion. What do I do next. I have 12 acres and plenty of pheasant wings in the freezer.


by  APATZ_GSP Not the most knowing on here but i got a pup to and alot will tell you to let it be a pup and invest in huntsmith dvd puppy 1 and 2 and or the perfect start/ perfect finish dvd’s by perfection kennels. and welcome to the forum


by  RayGubernat Read several different training books and watch a couple of videos.

Then pick an approach that makes sense to you and that you feel comfortable with, make a plan and go out and do it.

I would pretty much toss those pheasant wings. Dogs are supposed to hunt for birds…not bird parts.

If you want to do something constructive between now and then, set up a pigeon coop and get some homers going. Pigeons are quite possibly the best training bird you can have for a youngster. For a puppy, only an ample supply of wild birds is better, IMO.

RayG


by  redman25 What they said. Especially what Ray said about the pigeons. I waited to find birds and now it’s a constant struggle. Click on the puppy mistakes link on the opening page of this site……lot’s of good info there.


by  Ruffshooter Ditto: Get rid of the pheasant wings after you play one or two times with them.

Basic household obedience, lots of walks and exploring. Let the pup learn about the out doors, about its own tools, nose eyes etc. Let it chase tweeties, butterlfylyes snow flakes. Don’t talk or try to encourage the dog too much. In other words just go for walks. Let it learn. Lots of good socializtion, people, animals, other dogs other places, different fields and woods etc. A well socialized pup, a pup that is left to learn its own capabilities and tools will be a more independent, confident dog. Keep the pup safe. Enjoy the journey.


by  ultracarry The more he or she runs the better they sleep:). That’s what I live by now. What I would do is check out some events around your area and talk with pros and trainers about what you should do. I learned a lot yesterday by talking to some people. Don’t matter if its a visa club.. gsp guys are everywhere.


by  Don Ya got nailed on those wings pertty quick and rightfully so, toss’em. Good time to build a loft and stock it. Doesn’t need to be real big, about one square foot per bird. They can be built with scrap material too. Where are you in Eastern Washington?


by  Chukar12 Wills,

Ray said it all…
BTW Craigslist is a good start for pigeons


by  wills1235 Thanks for all the info. I especially like the one about letting the dog get out and explore and learn about the world.

Books are on order. I’ve got the following coming:
“How to Have The Best Trained Gun Dog, Taking Advantage of Proven, Unique Training Methods, All Natural – No Expensive Electronics Needed”
“The German Shorthaired Pointer: a Hunter’s Guide”
“How to Help Gun Dogs Train Themselves, Taking Advantage of Early Condtioned Learning”
Any other suggestions?

Pigeons are no problem, got a barn full of ‘em. Just need to trap a few, and my chickens are about to need a bigger coop, so maybe I’ll move pigeons into the old one. I’ve also got Quail, Hun, and Pheasant living on the property, once dog training season opens.

I was surprised by the responses regarding the pheasant wings. I thought they were supposed to be a good tool, especially for teaching soft mouth and getting the dog used to retrieving feathers.

And I’m in Dayton, half an hour east of Walla Walla, for whoever was asking. If you’re in the neighborhood and want to get out hunting let me know!


by  wills1235 Also I’ve got a good line on a trainer- GWP breeder, but if anyone knows of another good pointer trainer in eastern Washington, please let me know so I can compare.


Raising quail/chukar

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=24856

by  desertcountrygsp Trying to find out what would be better to raise here in northern arizona. We have temps in the winter ranging from 15 degrees and summer temps 105+. I already have a pigeon cage that I am going to convert to a quail/chukar pen with a fly cage. I can raise bob whites in arizona without a license. anyone had experience raising either bird type?


by  quailrunner I am doing the exact same thing, converting a pigeon coop to a setup for quail. I have had both bobwhites and chukars in the past and I don’t think the weather will be your main concern since they have the coop to get out of the rain and snow (what little we get these days). I am in Central New Mexico and our temps. are about the same as yours.
Since pigeons carry all kinds of nasty little diseases and worms, I am going to move my coop to a new location in the yard, sterilize as best I can the coop with a diluted bleach, then start off with about 100 bobwhite. I like the bobs better because they recall so easily, and if you want to hatch your own eggs, to me they are easier. Cholera seems to be the disease to watch out for quail that are kept on the ground, so keeping the cage clean and I think the more southern the exposure the better. My last batch of bobs (which was a few years ago) died suddenly. About 30 birds were doing great one day and the next they were toast. I believe it was due to the cage being on the west side of a building and under a tree, so the ground didn’t see much sun.


by  snips I have heard you cannot raise Chuker on the ground.


by  Wildweeds I’m really quite certain that this is horse feathers,I’ve raised them on the ground in three different locations over the course of the last 18 years, My soil at all three places was well drained however,Chukars are easier to raise than bobs IMO but they eat more feed.Fact is my buddy and I just started a business for the kids to run raising gamebirds for sale for training and selling to field trialers/hunt testers. We’ve got chukars,pheasants,bobwhites and Valley quail.Construction on a 100 foot by 50 foot by 17 foot tall flight pen is slated for later next month.

Pigeons are nasty things and before I was to try raising gamebirds I’d clean it out spotless and give it a bath in bleach or One Stroke Envirion which kills all bacteria that cause diesease.

snips wrote:I have heard you cannot raise Chuker on the ground.


by  mcbosco I may do this with someone. This weekend I bought three pathetic Coturnix for $20 only to have them grabbed by a Park Ranger even before I took them out of the box: “illegal to release game birds here” he told me and now I have a ticket to pay.


by  mm Whats the fine on that. I was told here in my state non native game birds are ok to release and even shoot all year long. But for Bobwhites you need a license to own or breed.
mm


by  mcbosco I am not sure what the fine is as I didn’t call. There are 11 designated areas where dogs may be trained with live birds and the county park where I got nailed is not one. Even on those you need a special permit, well really its a receipt that you bought the birds from a licensed bird dealer. I didn’t have that either.


by  birddog1968 Northern bobs can be somewhat fragile….if you were set on using quail I would try and get my hands
on some Wisconsin Jumbo quail.

The chukar are pretty easy to raise, much more hardy than northern bobs. Wisconsin Jumbos are about
the same as Chukar. They are lively tough lil birds and work great for training purposes. They will only get to jumbo size if fed hard….otherwise just a little bigger than Northerns but about twice as hardy.

Any birds can be raised on the ground but disease will be a problem in wet climates….also best to salt the ground to keep capillary worms and other parasites down if raised on dirt.

I raised jumbos and chukar commercially by the thousands, and all my birds were on wire, but you can raise on dirt if you pay close attention to sanitation and disease prevention. Rock Salt helps alot raising birds on the ground…dissolve in warm water and spray with a backpack type sprayer. Make sure you rinse you sprayer well before and after. +1 on the bleach washdown before getting started as well.


pigeon coop

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=89&t=13853

by  weim-owner Does anybody have design plans (or pics) for a pigeon coop.. something that will hold 6-12 birds. Any info would be great.
Thanks


by  Brittguy try this link for ideas. http://www.redroselofts.com/starter_loft.htm scroll down to the page and there are a lot of lofts.


by  Nebraska If you have the room and $$, those redrose lofts look great. I decided to start small and am going with one like this:

http://www.uplandbirddog.com/training/loft.html


by  littleking http://www.huntohio.net/index.php?t=msg … 2&start=0&


by  utahmomof4 Lion Country Supply also sells plans for a coop that looks pretty simple, but functional.


by  Higgins Here is a picture of a nice, small coop. The plans are well detailed and include step by step instructions. A materials list is included too. I’ve had clients build this one off the plans and it went together real well.

Click on the link then scroll down. The coop plans are the last thing on the page.
http://www.higginsgundogs.com/store.htm

Brad Higgins
Higgins Gundogs
Home of the Higgins Remote Releaser


by  luke0927 im working on one of the redrose lofts now…i have made few altercations but very similar.


by  JakeDD Can’t believe nobody has linked back to the GDF Hall of Fame pigeon post.
It’s titled “Starting with Pigeons” – you can find it HERE
It may not have the exact setup you’re looking for, but some great information and coop ideas.


by  mtlee

utahmomof4 wrote:Lion Country Supply also sells plans for a coop that looks pretty simple, but functional.

I’ve got these plans in .pdf file. If you want them PM your email address and I’ll send them to you.


by  MillerClemsonHD I used these plans from Matt. If you go this route PM me and I will give you some tips to make life much easier when building it. I can send you some pictures of the finished product as well.

mtlee wrote:

utahmomof4 wrote:Lion Country Supply also sells plans for a coop that looks pretty simple, but functional.

I’ve got these plans in .pdf file. If you want them PM your email address and I’ll send them to you.


by  Nebraska How about posting the pics??


by  Nebraska Here’s a pic of MillerClemsonHD’s coop…..


by  ohiogsp

Nebraska wrote:Here’s a pic of MillerClemsonHD’s coop…..

I like your coop but one thing I would change is the roof should overhang alot more on the edges. If it rains in the coop and it is wet your birds will get sick (respitory infection). Nice coop.


by  MillerClemsonHD Thanks. I just followed the directions but see what you are saying and will make that change. Always have some spare plywood around. There are quite a few things I would do differently if I built it again which I will probably build another one eventually

I like your coop but one thing I would change is the roof should overhang alot more on the edges. If it rains in the coop and it is wet your birds will get sick (respitory infection). Nice coop.[/quote]


OLD PIGEON COOP

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=59&t=4073

by  snips We have an old pigeon coop we would give away if anyone wants it. It is about 9′ long, 3′ high, and 3′ deep. Would fit in a pick up. It has a door in front with the bars in it for return. Does not have legs on it, needs legs. Has an old brood boxes in it, they are n pretty bad shape.Needs a little wire work.


Training springer for rabbits? (kinda long)

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=89&t=22967

by  Netzapper (First post here. I apologize if I’m unaware of appropriate conventions.)

My wife and I bought an excellently bred field-line springer spaniel puppy in January. He’s now almost six months old. Initially, I had no intention of hunting him and so just did the usual housepet obedience training (at which he’s been quite satisfactory). But, he’s so well bred that he desperately *wants* to hunt. Everything from leaves in the wind to songbirds to anything he scents in the brush–he thinks raccoons are, perhaps, a bit too large. He naturally, if inefficiently, quarters on ours walks. He has a proud, cheerful natural retrieve that just melts your heart. Excellent pup. It’d be a crying shame to let all that go to waste. So I decided I’d take him hunting–I shoot anyway, just haven’t hunted.

But what do I hunt? This is for the dog to utilize his natural talents, and provide an excuse to wander fields with a shotgun. I don’t really want to deal with bag limits and seasons, or small, sparse populations. Not to mention I’m not really a big fan of the taste of fowl in general, although game meat is better than most. So after reviewing the relevant state game regulations, and my cookbooks, I settled on rabbit. They’re underhunted and overpopulated many places. A spaniel will flush them. And based on childhood BB gun experiences in suburbia, I reckon they’re fun to hunt.

This’ll be the first hunting dog I’ve trained. This is also the first dog I’ve had in my adult life. So at least for some sort of starting point for building a training program, I bought the book “Hup!” by James(?) Spencer. I’d be proud to walk a dog with even half the skills described in that book. His technique seems quite reasonable, as well, if expensive in pigeons. But therein lies the conundrum: a pigeon is a bird, which is not a rabbit.

Should I use rabbits? Hobbled bunnies in place of clipped pigeons? How do I dizzy a bunny? (For that matter, how does one dizzy a pigeon?)

Or should I train on birds? If I train on birds, do I have the potential to teach him to hunt both birds *and* rabbits? Will I be able to, in some way, indicate that today we’re hunting pheasant, but tomorrow we’re hunting wabbit? Or would every pheasant hunt also be a rabbit hunt? (I’d be fine with any of those answers, frankly.)

Please, give me your advice. I need to know whether I’m saving up for a pigeon coop or rabbit hutches. Or if I’m totally off base and need some completely different training scheme entirely.


by  Ditch__Parrot dizzy bunnies Thanks for the chuckle its been a long day I needed that.

I’ll try to help a little. Little different perspective since I have pointing dogs and you have a flusher but I’ll give it a shot. First off I can’t imagine using any dizzy bunnies for training. Birds you just tuck their head under their wing, pull their feet out straight and rock or shake them a bit and they pass right out.

I break my dogs off of rabbits but I have a friend that regularly hunts rabbits with his pointing dog, and i’ve enjoyed shooting bunnies over him numerous times. I’m pretty sure the same general principles would apply for flushers. There is no way to tell the dog one day we hunt one thing the next day something else. My buddy regularly hunts pheasant, quail, and rabbits at the same time. Usually you can tell by the way the dog is acting rather if its a rabbit (little less excited) or a bird they are scenting, but sometimes its just a suprise when you flush. I guess i’ve just used way too many words to say that the dog is expected to handle his bunnies just like a bird.

I think the biggest thing with hunting rabbits with a flusher would be training the dog to sit when they flush. This would be for safetey. Most of the people that I have bird hunted with that had flushers never trained to that degree. With the bunnies it would be essential though. IMO

Congrats on the pup. Welcome to the world of gun dogs.


by  Netzapper

Ditch__Parrot wrote:I think the biggest thing with hunting rabbits with a flusher would be training the dog to sit when they flush. This would be for safetey. Most of the people that I have bird hunted with that had flushers never trained to that degree. With the bunnies it would be essential though. IMO

Congrats on the pup. Welcome to the world of gun dogs.

I think you’re absolutely correct. With a bird, they’re pretty likely to take flight at some point, right? So you can shoot (literally) over the dog at the bird (even in training). A partially trained spaniel could still hunt birds. With a rabbit, he’ll need to reliably hup on flush for me to have any shot whatsoever.

That actually helps me in my overall conundrum. If a bird-trained dog will hunt rabbit, maybe it’s better to train him on birds in the first place. I did see a great Afghan recipe for squab.


by  Sharon Seems to me he needs the same training as we train the beagle – rabbit pen at a local beagle club and lots of experience in the woods on rabbit. I’d be looking at some Beagle Training Books. I know he can’t track like a beagle but the rabbit introduction could be the same.


by  jimbo&rooster I would imagine that if rabbits are over populated as you say that you should be able to find some public or private ground where there are a bunch of bunnies and just let the pup run. the pup will eventually start to bump the bunnies and chse them. for a while id just let the pup chase. you can worry about sit to flush later. my lab will flush and retrieve rabbits while we are out hunting quail and pheasants the fun thing is she’ll even retrieve the bunnies to hand (never owned a beagle that would retrieve) . the dog wont be able to differentiate between birds and bunnies you will just have some bonus flushes on birds from time to time. good luck
Jim


by  WiskeyJaR I would think using the CC would come in handy here. In side a large pen or yard, using the CC to teach sit or “HUP” on flush. Inside a fenced area so you can “recycle” the rabbit. Maybe use a bird launcher with a weaken spring so as not to fling the rabbit sky high when launched…)

I too am training me dog to hunt both rabbits and birds. The thing Im worried about most when interducing me pup to a live rabbit, is if the pup tries to retrive a live rabbit and the rabbit starts kicking is the claws scratching the pup up, and causing the pup to start to balk at a rabbit, or to become “hard mouth” to kill rabbit, whitch isnt what you want when working with birds.

Keep us posted on how your training is coming.

WiskeyJaR


Building your first pigeon coop…..

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=100&t=15397

by  Nebraska Thought I’d post some pics of my coop in case anyone was considering building one of their own.

I’ve haven’t had pigeons in it very long but one of the females is already sitting on a couple eggs so hopefully I’ll have some young ones to home to my coop by next spring/summer. It was a lot of fun and the design was pretty efficient so it wasn’t too spendy either……hope you get some ideas from this for one of your own!!!

Gettin’ started….two sheets of plywood are enough for all four walls.

Put 2x4s on the bottom to stengthen the legs and support the floor….

Put in a couple 2x4s across the back to support the shelves and put in the floor…..(dauther thought I should turn it into a playhouse!!)

Put in the nesting box divider and rest of the supports for the shelves….

I subcontracted out the tough stuff…..

Cut the doors with the circular saw, added some perches and hinges and then cut them the rest of the way open with a jig saw (much easier that doing hinges on a loose door)….

I painted the inside and out while it was open…..(not that it matters that much )

I screwed on the top and built the aviary and loaded it with birds…..

I put plywood on both sides and and across the top of the aviary so I only had to use one roll of mesh and doors on both sides of the wire cage for easy access……

From the door on the right side…..large “bullet feeder and grit container.

From the door on the left side…..large galvanized drinker with stand and heater (cord goes out the door in the floor).

One happy camper is already sitting on a clutch so we must have done something right with the nesting bowls and pine needles…..

Pigeon on the right has feathers on her feet. Not sure what kind she is but she’s super friendly so I think we’ll keep her…….

I’ll give ya one guess why there’s a brown ring in the grass around the coop……

Don’t take these as gospel but this is what I came up with after running a quick tape on my coop…..

(I used 5/8ths plywood)

Walls -
Cut from 4×8′ sheets (96″)

Front – 52″H makes Back – 44″H and 48″W

Sides (cut from same sheet by starting at 52″ and cutting at an angle to the 44″ mark on the other side)
52″H in front and 44″H in back and 48″W

Roof 56″ x 48″W
Floor 48″ x 46 3/4″

Nest boxes -
Middle Support for boxes – 14″ Deep and 43 1/4″ H in front angling down to 41″ H in back (cut using side as template for angle)
Box platforms – 23 1/2″ W by 14″ D (Box heights = 14″H)
I used 1x4s for supports under each box (on sides and middle support), 2x4s supporting box bottoms in back, 1x4s (or 1x3s) along front of the nest boxes

Frame
Legs – 8 foot 2x4s (4 each)
Floor/Ceiling support will take four 2x4s

Aviary overall = 28″Tx33D”x36″W (Mesh roll used = 36″ x 10′)
Frame is 2x2s
4 – 36″ for top/bottom on front and back
8 – 30″ front to back
7 – 25″ supporting roof/floor

plywood across top of aviary – 37 1/2″ W – 12″ D
plywood on sides of aviary – 28″H – 16 1/2″ D

Doors
Aviary – 20″T x 11″W
Side – 26″T x 17″W
Trap door and door to aviary – 10″T x 12″W
Bottom – 10″T x 10″W

Easy perches = 5″ 1×4 screwed to end of 4″ 2×4

**Update**
I have several birds laying eggs/hatching chicks so the coop is working well…..

A couple new additions (#5/#6)

I added a “Settling Cage” per OhioGSP’s thread (pieced together from some wire fence I had sitting around) to get my birds oriented to the trap door without having to let them out just yet. They’re diggin’ it big time……

Here’s a pic from their first release away from the coop……


by  natetnc is it painted white so the pigeons can see it better?


by  Nebraska

natetnc wrote:is it painted white so the pigeons can see it better?

Either that or so my neighbors can tell where all the stray pigeons are coming from…..


by  briguyz71 Very nice job. You look a little younger than I thought when I saw you with that drill . I was wondering what you use for grit?
Thanks,
Bri


by  WiskeyJaR nice looking coop. I see your dogs have inspected your handy work already eh?


by  AZ Brittany Guy Very nice job! Just like mine only more professional. I used hardweare colth for the floor.


by  Don I thought you were over here. Very nice job. Just one question, whats the door in the bottom for? also as I recall, it doesn’t look like you have a preditor door for the re-entry. Great job though!!!


by  Nebraska Hi Don,

I thought the pic of your pointer looked familiar! I put the door in the bottom so I could push the scrapings into a 5 gallon bucket when it’s time to clean. That’s also where I have the cord come out for the heated drinker. So far, it’s just as easy to scoop the scrapings from the side so skipping the door in the floor wouldn’t be a big deal.

The predator door is on there, it’s just not easy to see from the pics. In the last pic, you can see that it’s closed; and when it’s open, it lays on the platform across the top of the aviary…

Take care,
Jeff


by  GWP-Fritz Thank you for posting this!

I just finished a similar coop. I looked at your design and tried to copy it. It was easy to put together but then I had to find some friends to help me move it into place. I painted it with extra paint we had around and left most of the roof white on top.

I put the birds in and they seem to approve, though the dogs won’t leave it alone.

I am going try to post pictures of it.

Thanks again!


by  AZ Brittany Guy [quote="GWP-Fritz"]Thank you for posting this!

I just finished a similar coop. I looked at your design and tried to copy it. It was easy to put together but then I had to find some friends to help me move it into place”

To help move it to different locations, I put handles on either side and it really helps.


by  Nebraska Nice work! I bet the birds will like that extra large aviary…..

Not sure about you but I attached mine to the coop with screws but think I’m going to secure it with some 1/2″ bolts once it gets warmer to esure it doesn’t go anywhere once we start getting severe T-storms and the heavy Spring winds….


by  ezzy333 I think I would put a couple of legs under the front of it to keep the whole thing from tipping forward in a wind.

Ezzy


by  Nebraska I used a post hole digger to set the legs on my coop ~ 2 feet in the ground so unless a storm/tornado rips it apart, it shouldn’t be going anywhere…..


by  GWP-Fritz I planted mine in the ground about 18″ as well. I just got a new post hole digger for my tractor and I wanted to use it. We have had some pretty strong winds (gusts up to 50mph last week) and it was fine. I have considered legs for the aviary because if we get a huge snow i was worried about the weight. The way I attached the aviary was with screws and when I put the 2×4 on the front where the door to the aviary is I put a strip of plywood behind them so the aviary actually slid on and the 2×4 hold it in place. I don’t know if you can see it from the pictures but I can post a picture of it. I did it that way so I didn’t need someone to hold it while I screwed it in.

The birds seem to really like the aviary and I am just waiting on some nesting bowls.

Adam


by  postoakshorthairs Either of you guys have a materials list or a cost estimate?


by  Nebraska

postoakshorthairs wrote:Either of you guys have a materials list or a cost estimate?

I just edited in dimensions to the original post……hope that helps!!


by  gdog I built my first one like shown in the previous pics, then decided I wanted one I could walk into, but still not take up a ton of space:


by  GWP-Fritz I don’t remember exactly what I spent or used because it took a few trips to the hardware store but here is a close summary.

4 Sheets of Plywood – 2 for the walls, 1 for roof and misc., 1 for floor and misc (misc being shelves, perches, and aviary) I might have also used some scrap I had.
8-10 2×4′s – Legs, framing, shelves
6 2×2′s – aviary framing
1 roll of hardware cloth for aviary
5 sets of latches and hinges for doors on coop, aviary, and for door covering bobs
1 set of bobs I bought online
1 can Kilz
1 can extra paint I had laying around or you could buy a screw up can from store

That is all I can think of when I go through what all I bought at the store. Like I said it took me a few trips because I didn’t want to over do it and have to take stuff back and there is a big box store down the street.

One word of advise I picked up from the original post was to cut the doors but not all the way and then install the hardware. I read that after I did the first one and you can tell a difference between the doors.

I hope this helps.
Adam


by  DoubleB20 Very nice, I have a question. How do you catch the birds when it’s time for training? My coop now is smaller and it seems like I spend almost as much time trying to catch the birds in the coop as do I do using them for training. One word of experience, my dogs love to stand by the coop and catch the pigeon’s when they are free flying. The entry door is about 4 1/2 feet off the ground and the dogs have caught 4 pigeons this week.


by  ezzy333

DoubleB20 wrote:Very nice, I have a question. How do you catch the birds when it’s time for training? My coop now is smaller and it seems like I spend almost as much time trying to catch the birds in the coop as do I do using them for training. One word of experience, my dogs love to stand by the coop and catch the pigeon’s when they are free flying. The entry door is about 4 1/2 feet off the ground and the dogs have caught 4 pigeons this week.

You won’t have pigeons for long as they are smart enough to find a safe place to go plus you are setting your dogs back rapidly as that is exactly what you should be spending your time training them not to do.

Ezzy


by  postoakshorthairs Guys,
Thanks for the dimensions and list. I just wanted a rough idea of the cost before diving in (aka…knowing if i could sneak it by my wife ) I really like the looks of the one gdog built and the use of the metal studs but where do the dogs return? I prob just couldn’t see in the pics.


by  dlfl I would think that a butterfly net or pole crab net would work to catch the birds. We used a pole crab net at a pet store I worked at to catch the birds that got loose.


by  gdog

postoakshorthairs wrote:Guys,
Thanks for the dimensions and list. I just wanted a rough idea of the cost before diving in (aka…knowing if i could sneak it by my wife ) I really like the looks of the one gdog built and the use of the metal studs but where do the dogs return? I prob just couldn’t see in the pics.

I need to post up a new pic with the return entry. Looking at the front of the coop, I put the door in the side of the aveary on the lft hand side with a platform. It works great.

Here’s a link to more pics of the build: http://arappl.smugmug.com/gallery/3319486_9jYPJ#184704114_DCbRv


by  postoakshorthairs great pictures. I appreciate the insight. Son loves your dog by the way.


by  gspmo1 Very nice looking pigeon coops! Thanks for all the pics and instructions, I’m going to try building one in the near future


by  Nebraska Matching the stain on your coop and fence was a good idea. Nice design and sharp lookin’ to boot…..


by  gdog

Nebraska wrote:Matching the stain on your coop and fence was a good idea. Nice design and sharp lookin’ to boot…..

Ha..funny..that was to try and make the wife happy about the coop “blending” in


by  postoakshorthairs

Ha..funny..that was to try and make the wife happy about the coop “blending” in

Amazing isn’t it, we try to pull one over on our wives so we can harbor birds considered a pest by most people in order to walk around in the cold with a furry friend and harrass them. Gotta love america!


by  Nebraska **Updated the original post to show the “Settling Cage” used to get the birds oriented to the trap door without having to let them fly**


by  bmacinok copied from another link in gun dog…..

Nebraska,

I started a coop last fall, built it and populated it with homers from a friend a couple of hours away. I have one side of it with some breeding pairs and the other side with the homers and a few ferals. I kept the homers in for several weeks, then trained them with a temporary aviary (with them using the bobs). I would feed them in the aviary, with the bobs up (see pic below), and just lower a bob each day over the period of a week. They got real familiar with that real quick. I also followed OhioGSP’s information as well as some in our local NAVHDA chapter…very good help and information. I was pretty unsure when I released them but they all came back. When I started flying them from farther away I lost several of my ferals, but I kind of expected that. I am now flying them about a mile away (where my training field is) and have lost only about 5 birds (we have a lot of hawks). My breeders are starting to produce so I am hoping production can keep up with the hawks.

Side view with temp aviary:

My automatic waterers. They are bowls that gravity feed from a 55 gal plastic barrel behind the coop. It is all connected with garden host ending up in the bowl. The valve is brass. It has weathered the freezes we have had so far, however they have not been terrible. I am hoping the hose will not burst but just expand, the bowl will not crack as it is rounded, and the valve will not have any issues as it is brass. Hoping….

showing the water barrel:

Inside out looking at the bobs:

Bruce


by  Nebraska That’s a great set-up…..I especially like your drinker.


by  outhawkn that bird with the featherd legs is probably a tumbler of some sort. It will dilute your flocks homing ability if allowed to breed. In case you done know. Nice job!!!!


by  Hattrick ????? can you mix say chukers ,quail an pigeons in the same coop?


by  DoubleB20 This probably a dumb question, but does the color of the coop matter? Most of the one’s I see are white or light colored – didn’t know if that was on purpose or just what people had on hand.


by  Nebraska I painted mine white to reflect heat but I see ‘em painted lots of different colors so if you shooting to have it blend in with it’s surrounds by painting it a certain color, I’m sure you’d be fine.

To the other question, I don’t think that’s something that you’d want to do but I’ve never tried it. You’ll probably want to post that question in a new thread to get good info…..


by  MadMax I have a question for those of you that have coops. I am about to build my own, but am very concerned about health risks. How do you control mites? I’ve heard that is one of the major problems with pigeons, the second would be the droppings. Can they cause respiratory problems? How about my dogs, can they contract any illnesses from retrieving these birds? Any info would help.


by  bmacinok My coop is painted a brown color to try and blend in with the trees. The pigeons have no problem coming back to it.

As far as droppings are concerned I just scoop them once in a while and put them in a trash bag. I know there is talk of possibly getting a respiratory issue, so I try to keep my mouth covered up when I am scooping.

Bruce


by  Coveyrise64

MadMax wrote:I have a question for those of you that have coops. I am about to build my own, but am very concerned about health risks. How do you control mites? I’ve heard that is one of the major problems with pigeons, the second would be the droppings. Can they cause respiratory problems? How about my dogs, can they contract any illnesses from retrieving these birds? Any info would help.

For mites a drop of Ivermection under each wing and/or each leg will do the trick. I also put a couple of drops of Ivermectin down the throat for internal parasites. I’m not sure how bmackinok is able to cover his mouth ….so I use a respirator. A dust mask will work but I prefer a little better protection.

Coveyrise64


by  Jester i am finshing up a coop for what is the most part the same. how many birds can one keep in this set up as i have been offed 40 at no cost will this be to many?


by  bmacinok Jester,

I don’t know what optimum is for pigeons, but in my coop (the brown one in this thread) I have had up to 50 birds. Right now I have about 30 and they are producing and seem to be doing just fine. All of these birds are homer/roller crosses. I keep my killer feral birds in a temporary cage that is an 8′ x 4′ x ’4 frame using 2″ x 4″s and 1/2″ x 1″ wire, with a tarp over the top and have had about 40 in it. Of course they don’t stay there for long…

bmacinok


by  Nebraska IMO, 10 to 12 birds would be optimal.

I currently have 5 birds but I’ve had up to 20 birds in that coop (short-term) without any issues.


by  imelda11 Hey There!
Its nice!
I like it!
Are you a Carpentre!?ehe
Keep on posting!
Thanks!…


by  jkoehler So when I get my coop built and put some pigeons in, how long should I keep them in before I use them for training so that they return? I plan on getting some birds that are about 100 miles away, will that keep them in my loft?
What type of food? regular bird feed? crushed corn?


by  bmacinok I transitioned adult birds from someone else’s coop, and most of the birds hung around. I did keep them in the coop for a couple of months, then only let them out in the evening right before dark so they would only fly for a bit then come back in to roost. Probably did that for a month then started taking them out further and further to get them used to homing. I did lose a few, just not sure if it was to them not homing or the hawks which we have a lot of.

If you start producing young they will definitely home to your coop.

I would use a pigeon mix from your local feed store. A lot of folks use just whatever, but I found I had problems with cracked corn on the young, seems they can’t handle the sharp edges in their craw.


by  Richard *UT*

jkoehler wrote:So when I get my coop built and put some pigeons in, how long should I keep them in before I use them for training so that they return? I plan on getting some birds that are about 100 miles away, will that keep them in my loft?
What type of food? regular bird feed? crushed corn?

Or you can look for “young Birds”. These birds are birds that can eat on thier own but have not been flown yet. That way you only have to wait a few weeks and then start letting them out close to dusk. I also feed a feed called pigeon checkers. Great feed, pigeons love it so that the bird home fast and don’t crap on the neighbors cars. Keeps every one happy and more importantly QUIET. If you have time, like now where you aren’t using the pigeons alot you can lock them up for a couple months.


by  sh0rthair

bmacinok wrote: I did keep them in the coop for a couple of months, then only let them out in the evening right before dark so they would only fly for a bit then come back in to roost. Probably did that for a month then started taking them out further and further to get them used to homing. I did lose a few, just not sure if it was to them not homing or the hawks which we have a lot of.

If you start producing young they will definitely home to your coop.

I would use a pigeon mix from your local feed store. A lot of folks use just whatever, but I found I had problems with cracked corn on the young, seems they can’t handle the sharp edges in their craw.

This is also how I transition new birds. However, I go 3 to 4 months instead of just a couple.
If they lay eggs I let them out sooner.
If I get young birds, I like it when they still have some (very few) yellow feathers (I’m having a brain fart for the proper term so I will call them Yellow feathers) on them. They are old enough to take care of themselves and they will home back to your coop.

There are many different choices when it comes to pigeon food.
I feed a pigeon food with corn in the cold months and without corn in the warm/hot months.


by  Munster I am wondering if you cluld use some kind of a glossy finish board like waynescoat on the inside to aid in easier clean up? Or will the birds not really like that idea?


by  ezzy333 I used tempered hard board and some odd sheets of Merlite like they used to use around the bathtub. Its hard and glossy and needs little cleaning.

Ezzy


Photo contest – April

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=17539

by  Rob So, we have been running a monthly picture contest with each month’s winner receiving their choice of a $25 Cabela’s gift card or a 1 year Premier subscription to GDF. There is also a possibility that their photos may appear in a calendar to benefit GDF if we can work out the details.

So far, here are the monthly winners:
January:

February:

March:

Please, keep posting all of your wonderful shots. And rest assured, the submissions from previous months will remain under consideration going forward. Please post your new shots for April here. Deadline will be March 31st (more or less).

Also, if anyone has a suggestion for discussing the calendar idea with GDF, please PM me.

Thanks,
Rob


by  Winglish Here are a few of my buddies:


by  cjuve Here are a couple more they are of the same point just different angles


by  DoubleB20 Beautiful Pictures – how about a Vizsla after a limit of snipe in Texas? This is Journey.


by  Rob DoubleB:

That is an awesome shot, and just the kind of thing we are looking for!

Rob


by  BoJack Rockin Elhew Doc-Headed for the grouse woods soon.


by  Rob I can never resist the puppy pics.


by  kninebirddog someone say puppies


by  kninebirddog


by  WildRose How about some four and five month old Shorthairs on wild birds?

Or “How to introduce your puppy to Horses”

“Hey, wanna be my friend”???, “Let’s Play”!

“Hmm I like the new “chew toy”….

“C’mon, I said “Play, not Nap!”" !!!


by  Rob That horse definitely looks like it has been there before!

Rob


by  prairiefirepointers 7 weeks old.. First bird


by  osurugger15 Here are a few. I love threads like this.





by  gdog Puppy pics. 8 week old Pudelpointer.

Can you guess who picked out the pink collar?

**** Update – 13 weeks and getting big!


by  wems2371

gdogweek old Pudelpointer. wrote:Can you guess who picked out the pink collar?

Someone with excellent fashion sense. Great photos everybody.


by  texscala Here is my pup on a wild chukar

Sorry about the giant beeper collar but as a starving college kid $20 on e-bay seemed about right and without it I would never find her.


by  zodiakgsps 9 week old pup:

Same pup at 5mnths:


by  zodiakgsps Thought I’d put this one in too…this is the boy we lost 2 weeks ago, “Chief”.


by  crackerd Counterbalancing all the pup photos–great shots, gdog’s in particular–here’s a 12-year-old doing what she’s done, oh, a couple thousand times before.

MG


by  BCA1228


by  postoakshorthairs My dog Spook as the king of the bed

My daughter and her pup


by  Rob Great stuff.


by  DGFavor Holy cow!! Awesome stuff folks!!

Here is my pup on a wild chukar

Sorry about the giant beeper collar

That’s a for real workin’ hunting dawg man wearin’ ‘er uniform!!


by  phermes1 Not hunting – at least not for me.
This was taken at the beach near my house. The pups like chasing pelicans.


by  phermes1 I took this photo of a friend’s dog, Bart. Bart lost a leg to osteosarcoma last summer. Since then, he’s finished his SH, earned 3 MH legs, (oh, the irony) a couple field trial placements – and won a halloween costume contest dressed as a pirate, complete with hook. His owner was naturally dressed up as his wench.


by  zodiakgsps Phermes, that’s awesome, great pic!!! Nice to see they kept him in the field and he’s doing well!
Shot from today, Tara with my old boy Mac backing her:


by  Sharon

phermes1 wrote:I took this photo of a friend’s dog, Bart. Bart lost a leg to osteosarcoma last summer. Since then, he’s finished his SH, earned 3 MH legs, (oh, the irony) a couple field trial placements – and won a halloween costume contest dressed as a pirate, complete with hook. His owner was naturally dressed up as his wench.

Isn’t that great!! Being a great dog is all about the things we can’t teach – like desire and heart.


by  Ridge-Point Ridge-Point Ruff-nTuff (left) and Ridge-Point Duke of Envy (right) showing thier stuff on the last weekend of Chukar season here in Oregon. The bird numbers were way down this year, so my Father decided to shoulder his shotgun and break out the camera. These two pups really worked hard this season and were rewarded for thier efforts. Duke is owned by Volraider and hunted this season with me in Oregon.


by  EddieF Oh my, these two are very, very nice. This is going to be a beautiful calendar!!


by  Gordon Guy

Taran’s Tallgrass Samie, Chukar hunting in OR
Samie Head Shot OR 1.JPG (188.26 KiB) Viewed 665 times
Tallgrass Pistol Pete, my 5 month old.
Pete Pointing Feb 09.JPG (154.48 KiB) Viewed 659 times

by  h.q.s Ridge-Point:

You have some good lookin dogs there.


by  Bigsur009 phermes….must be a vizsla thing! mine does the same thing when he sees pelicans or little beach birds.


by  sfellc A few of my babies:


by  Vonrommel


by  bwjohn Here is a couple of my favorites.


by  bwjohn Sorry, did not know how to resize those.

brandon


by  Rob Awesome stuff! I hope somebody can make a calendar happen – there are too many great photos here to go to waste.


by  gdog


by  gozz21 Here are some pictures of my 8 month old shorthair. I thought I would post a couple of them from training last weekend.

let me know what you think


by  postoakshorthairs one more from the weekend


by  Oscar
weimaraner RINGO ( ficture was in 1976 Tesar Lents )

My weimaraner Morgan with a hare in 1984

My golden Dora Midas Touch in water retriever.

Brawning retriving and Purdey Back ( no collar) . Picture was take in 92 Leika III F and ambar filter.

Purdey take a directions

I hope you like my old pictures.

Oscar CHávez
Mexico.


by  limited out


by  Mntmaniac


by  Ridge-Point Great shots everyone.

Mntmaniac those pictures are very nice.


by  limited out I agree. Great shots! Mtnmaniac – I thought I could clear that second one up for you. I’m no expert, but I thought it gave it a fresh look. I also like the Sunset look… but thought I could still try anyway.


by  Mr. Crappie In my opinion everyone of these photos could be the cover of any hunting magazine. They are awesome!!


by  DGFavor Was hoping to come home with a potential winner from last set of field trials I went to but radiography took precedence over photography!!


by  jakemaster Dg we can wait for more of your great photo’s. Glad you are ok.that is a cool photo.


by  brookzee yeah, heard about that doug. bbq at my place this weekend……..RIBS and all the fixins…..ok, maybe it was a bad joke.

jason


by  firstchoicehardwood Our favorite place to relax and take a break from hunting!


Dog training in the city or suburbs?

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=14130

by  JFS I have a 7 mo Brit I want to train as a gun dog (and I’m still learning myself). This morning I put my new copy of The Perfect Start in the DVD player to see what I can learn. My main take away so far is that I am swimming upstream with this- the video was full of images of wide open fields and releases of homers. I have no fields and no place to keep homers. I manage to keep a few quail in a small pen in my garage. The nearest public training fields are an hour away, so I have mostly my 1/4 acre backyard to work in. Shooting guns, even blank pistols, will be a challenge with the neighbors. While my heart is on the farm, my family is stuck in the city. My dog is my buddy and I have no interest in sending him off for long periods for others to train, especially if he will just lose the benefits upon retuning to an inadequate home schedule.

So maybe that’s life. You can’t learn to snow ski in Miami or reef dive in Kansas, and the city isn’t the place to train bird dogs. But I’m not willing to give up so easily. Maybe I can’t do it perfectly but I still want to try. I ordered some harnesses for the quail so I can recover them after flushing. I plan on getting up early one day a week and driving out the WMA to train where I can shoot. I can work on pure obedience skills during the week so that we can maximize whatever time we get in the field. But I’m not sure what else I can do given what I have to work with.

Has anyone else trained dogs in a similar situation? Have any tips or ideas on how to maximize training in a suburban environment? I would welcome all suggestions (short of moving, which is the obvious one but not possible until the kids get out of school). Thanks for any and all help.


by  Ryan Baumann build a little pigeon coop…. Go buy some pigeons and use a pigeon pole….. You’ve got to do what you got to do….. See how your dog does on them… adapt and over come…. then try to go out once every couple weeks to the training grounds and take some pigeons and make him hunt for them…. Your not down and out and theres nothing better than harvesting a bird over a dog you trained…. P.s. shoot the pigeons if you think he is ready when you take him where you can discharge a firearm….

Ryan.


by  Greg Jennings Have you checked out the Central Georgia Pointing Dog Club? They used to have everything that you need.

You could do yard work off days and go work on birds a couple or three days a week. You’d be far ahead of many.

Right now, if the pup has had a good bird intro and is really interested in birds, you can lay off the pen birds till pup is a 12-15 months old.

I do 15 minutes or so of yard work every weekday morning. Tuesdays, Thursdays and some weekend evenings, is bird work. Monday, Wednesday and Friday (or Sat or Sun), evenings are yard work and conditioning.

Curious why you can keep a few quail but couldn’t keep homers. Pen quail stink. Homers are clean by comparison. If you had 6-12 homers, you’d be set. Really good flying quail are good, but it’s not all that easy to find them or keep them in condition.

Greg J.


by  bobman North GA does not exactly lend itself to dog training and wild birds are almost a thing of the past so here my suggestion teach the dog to come when its called and dont worry about the rest, then take it out to Kansas or the Dakotas this fall a have some fun one week doing that and the dogs instincts will surface. Its too hot to do much training here right now anyway.

Do what Greg suggested if you can, even one time a week try to get out of dodge and find some quail or pigeons to let the dog work some birds.

If the dog has the breeding it has the instincts, theres some good woodcock exposure to be had in January, but other than that my dogs dont see a game bird from season to season living here, they do fine on my trips out west.

You don’t teach a dog to hunt they are born knowing how


by  zzweims Go to http://navhdaga.org and attend one of their training sessions. They train dogs together once a month at Whispering Pine, near Social Circle (just east of Atlanta). I think navhda is ideal for people in your situation. You will meet a lot of like minded folks who face the same urban/suburban obstacles. Many of them get together between training days and work their dogs at Whipering Pine, Central Georgia Pointing Dog Club (Milner), our farm (Gordon), and other locations, I’m sure.
Your dog will thank you for it.

And don’t forget the Georgia Brittney club! http://georgiabrittney.org

Aline
http://sitekreator.com/zzfarms


by  Brittguy Good advice has already been given I just wanted to add that if you do send him off the benefits will not be lost when he returns home. I have a friend that finished a dog pretty well mostly in his back yard ,but he did make about a 1 hour drive to our place quite often.


by  gar-dog There really is a lot you can do in your backyard – introducing the e-collar, check cord, healing, coming, whoa-ing, etc. It’s not like you need to get on birds everyday. I am in the suburbs and work in the backyard – even released chukar there once! I would get to parks and fields for some exploring, then I joined a training facility I get down to 3x per month or so for a couple of hours for the bird work. You can do it – just think outside the box.


by  jhoughton It depends where in Atlanta you live on how far it is to a place to train. I live in Marietta (near the square) and have a couple of places that I can train at without driving an hour. You have to do what it takes sometimes to get the job done. I will also drive down to Milner, I have driven up 90 miles to LaFayette to run the pups at Brenda’s and will drive out to Walton on occassion just to give the dogs a new field to run in. Living in the city and having dogs has its challenges, but it is not impossible.

Where in Atlanta are you located? I go out pretty much every week Fri-Sun once the weather cools down a little…you are more than welcome to tag along and I can get you on a few places that aren’t that far…


by  Greg Jennings

gar-dog wrote:There really is a lot you can do in your backyard.<snip>.healing, <snip> You can do it – just think outside the box.

Do you use a Rx or laying on of hands


by  grant Be sure to check into local WMAs also… You might have to drive a little bit, but it will be worth it. As the others mentioned, get in with a local clubs of sorts…


by  JFS Thanks for all the suggestions. I sent an email to the folks at navhdaga. It looks like there are some events coming up in September so I will try to check them out. I’m also going to revisit the homers. I found plans for a pigeon house that looks pretty good. I doubt the neighbors would really know what it is (until they see me popping pigeons into the air with a bird launcher), and I found a guy on GON (our local hunting website) that can cut the pieces for me, so I hope to get that in place by fall.

jhoughton, I sent you a PM. I’m also in Marietta (but over close to Roswell)- and would very much appreciate any help or advice you can give me.


by  RayGubernat JFS -

Until five years ago I lived in a subdivision in central NJ. My property was 100X125. I trained several dogs including three that actually competed and placed in AF trials (2 in walking stakes and 1 in horseback stakes).

The nearest decent place to run my dogs was 45 minutes away. The nearest GOOD place was an hour and a half.

If I can do it you can also.

You can do a lot of things in the yard, in preparation for the weekend(Saturday or Sunday) training session on birds. Honestly, once a dog is trained, once a week on birds is plenty.

The key, I think is planning and preparation. Pick up the birds you need on Friday night or have them boxed and ready Saturday morning so you can pick them up on the way to your training grounds. If your supplier is more expensive, but conveniently located…so what? If there is a preserve nearby that offesr a training package and you can get birds right there…it might be well worth the price of admission.

As far as doing pigeon work in the yard, I suggest that you inform your next door neighbors that you will be training your dog with a capgun and then, either do in fact use a capgun, or use the lowest power .22 crimps you can find. Acorn loads by Fiocchi are pretty mild. If they express any concern, you could show them the pistol and point out that the barrel is solid.

Either way, a blank pistol is NOT a firearm and does not fall under any of the Federal firearm regulations since it is incapable of propelling a projectile. It is, essentially the same as a children’s cap pistol as far as the law is concerned.

RayG


by  gar-dog

Greg Jennings wrote:

gar-dog wrote:There really is a lot you can do in your backyard.<snip>.healing, <snip> You can do it – just think outside the box.

Do you use a Rx or laying on of hands

Well, I speak in tongues and become some overcome I just look at a creature and the healing starts. It is really draining both physically and emotionaly. Here is me working some local teens:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUvzYpYXGak


by  Greg Jennings That’s really FUNNY! I laughed so hard I couldn’t breath!

Greg J.


Deciding between training or another dog

http://gundogforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=26102

by  KHill Hunting and training my dog has been limited financially. I have some money to invest in the situation and am trying to figure the best way to go. I’ve considered a started dog, sending my dog to a trainer or getting a launcher/ecollar.

About my dog: He is a 5 yr old Weimaraner. My main complaint is he bumps birds and when he does point he sometimes is not steady enough for us to get there. I used to think range was an issue but I realized if he would hold point, his range is not that problematic.
He swims and is a great retriever. His training so far has been yard work and hunting.
At 1 yr, he got a prize II 89 in the NA test.

Thanks for any thoughts.


by  Greg Jennings Make a check cord from stiff rope and a sturdy brass snap. Make a pigeon coop from scrap wood. Catch a few feral pigeons from overpasses. You’ll have to replace them till they raise there. Get a friend to help you, or get creative looping the check cord around a tree.

That Weim is pretty big. You might put a second collar around his flank to help your back when you set him back. If you need more “authority” when you stop him with the check cord, try using a prong collar.

Greg J


by  Ryman Gun Dog KHill,
I work with Weimar dogs all the time, one of my best friends is a Weimar breeder in Lancaster, Pa. If you need help with your dog training I will help you.
I have a Grouse dog training business in Potter County, Pa, how far away are you from Pa. I have a Weimar pup of my own, your dog is young and will need to mature
before he understands what is going on, many good Weimar dogs are very slow to mature.

RGD/Dave

Pine Creek Gretchen, still a pup at a year old


by  KHill Ryman,
Thanks for the offer but I’m about 12 hours from you as far as I can tell. Funny thing is I got my dog out of PA.

Mr Jennings…I was leaning toward the launcher in hopes that he would catch on and use instinct rather than trying to force him into a point. I have no problem intervening to get him to hold..but I want him to point on his own.


by  Ryman Gun Dog KHill,
If you have a trainer who works with Weimar dogs out your way you might want to look that person up and acquire some help. Lots of Weimar dogs today have
less point in them than tracking and retrieving ability, where in Pa did you get your pup, from which breeder. Was it from Wilson here in Western Pa.
RGD/Dave


by  Meller What state do you live in ?


by  KHill

Meller wrote:What state do you live in ?

Guess that was worth noting. I’m in N. Illinois…Rockford.


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