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Horse Question

Horse Question

Postby mm » Sun Dec 26, 2010 3:42 pm

I am a city guy and have never owned a horse, I have ridden a few rentals and had a few lessons. I cant manage a rental horse and a dog I just dont have the horse experience. I like walking trials but it would be nice to ride the other braces and watch seems like that would be a lot of fun. Anyhow I am thinking I may want to buy my own horse, I am thinking I would like one about 10 or 12 with maybe several years of field trials under his belt. Am I thinking right? Also as I said I dont know anything about horses so I guess I am ripe to be taken. What do I need to know and be prepared for, how should I judge a horse or test him out? What is coggins people always say they are up to date on? Also please I am just starting to consider this I am no where near ready to buy so no need to PM me with horses for sale yet , I will post when I am ready.
Thanks
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Re: Horse Question

Postby kbshorthairs » Sun Dec 26, 2010 9:00 pm

A horse is quite a commitment both in time and money. A trailer to transport the animal and a truck that can pull the trailer, a place to keep the animal, feed and vet care.
It is extremely easy to be taken advantage of when getting into the market for a horse and I would recommend getting a very experienced friend to assist in the process.
I agree with your idea about getting a trial experienced horse......at least 7 years old.

Here is how a vet explained coggins.
The "Coggins Test" screens the blood sample for exposure to the virus causing Equine Infections Anemia. This is a serious and often fatal disease that is spread by blood sucking flies. If an affected horse is bitten by such a fly he can then transmit the virus to another nearby horse. Horses that are "Coggins Positive" may not show any signs of clinical disease but act as a reservoir for other flies to bite and thus spread the virus to many other horses. If the horse starts to get sick, the signs of the disease are fever, depression, weight loss, anemia, and dependent edema (stocking up). Most states require that horses moving through the state have a Coggins taken every year - some states are six months, so check with your vet."
Good luck!
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Re: Horse Question

Postby mm » Wed Dec 29, 2010 4:56 am

Thank you for explaining that. I have been afraid to make the horse commitiment but I have been going to trials almost 5 years and I still want to continue so I have been thinking a horse would be nice. I do need everything starting with a truck so I am looking at those and I think I may get a new ford F150. The other thing is a place to keep the horse and I have been seeing very flexable deals on that as the economy has gotten worse. I can get full board, rough board or other deals with alternating days where the owners take care of each others horses. I am also looking at out of state part of the year maybe NJ as I travel through NJ to get to almost every trial. What does that coggins test cost? and what does some of the other stuff cost like floating teeth, shoes and what else is there to do, thats all I know about.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby Karen » Wed Dec 29, 2010 8:05 am

We pay $85 for front shoes on my horse, and $125 for 4 shoes on John's horse (it really depends on the horse if you need shoes at all, and if so, 2 or 4). I pull shoes in the winter when we don't ride so then trims are only $35. They're done every 6-8 weeks year round.

Our vet expenses are cheap. We payed $45 per horse in the fall for shots, and about $70 per horse in the spring for shots & coggins. Coggins isn't a big deal really...my vet charges around $20 for it...and $30 if it's a rush. The vet draws blood and sends it out for a test (for Equine infectious anemia). You get a form back in the mail with the results (usually takes about 2 weeks). You need to carry a copy of the form with you when you cross state lines, and boarding barns want to see a current coggins (in the last 12 months in NJ & NY I believe) to take you in as a boarder. A horse with a positive coggins is usually destroyed (they have to be boarded at a quarantine facility the rest of their lives if they're not destroyed).

We've yet to deal with a sick horse, knock on wood.

A dentist comes to the Champagne Classic at Medford every year and floats teeth for $40 (or $45, I don't remember) a horse. The last time one came to the barn to float teeth, I paid $100.

Field trial horses seem to run anywhere from $1000-$6000, and often the price is not a reflection of the quality of the horse. Some people feel that a horse in their mid-teens is too old, where a horse in that age range may be absolutely perfect for you as a beginner.

Our board is $189 from May - October and $219 November - April in Columbia, NJ (exit 4 off of Route 80). The boys are on pasture board, so they're outside 24/7 with a run-in shed. The board includes hay as needed, an automatic heated waterer, and the barn owner catches and stalls horses for the farrier & vet so we don't have to be there. We just leave a check made out to the vet or farrier with the amount blank...she fills it in for us. She feeds twice a day to your specifications. We buy grain from her by the scoop as both of ours are easy keepers and don't require much. It adds about $12/month to our board (or you can buy a can & provide your own feed). She'll feed whatever supplements you want too. Columbia is probably too far for you, but I thought I'd throw it out there as it really is cheap board AND there's an indoor ring if you want to ride at night or when there's snow/ice on the ground. www.nativehuefarm.com

I think I paid $3500 for an old 2 horse trailer with manger & tack compartment. We've used that trailer going on 5 years now. We'd love to replace, but it'll probably be another year or so.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby kninebirddog » Wed Dec 29, 2010 9:57 am

mm wrote:Thank you for explaining that. I have been afraid to make the horse commitiment but I have been going to trials almost 5 years and I still want to continue so I have been thinking a horse would be nice. I do need everything starting with a truck so I am looking at those and I think I may get a new ford F150. The other thing is a place to keep the horse and I have been seeing very flexable deals on that as the economy has gotten worse. I can get full board, rough board or other deals with alternating days where the owners take care of each others horses. I am also looking at out of state part of the year maybe NJ as I travel through NJ to get to almost every trial. What does that coggins test cost? and what does some of the other stuff cost like floating teeth, shoes and what else is there to do, thats all I know about.


Many of the shots and worming you can do yourself
Coggins has to be done by the vet

Getting a horse Shod average I see is about 75-100 bucks for regular can be 25-50 bucks more if your horse needs corrective work done That needs to be done by someone who knows what they are doing

Bale of hay can vary also small bales can be about 4-5 bucks the larger 100 plus pound bales can go about 8-10 bucks a bale the larger bales last about a week plus if you supplement with some grain during higher work or colder weather

Then there is a properly fitting saddle for your horse and you plus other Tack required for riding and care.

Also the Trailer to haul them around..When buying a used trailer look at the floor and the axles but you can get deals on them from time to time specially if you know any buddies that are in rodeo..

Then for a truck a 150 can do it but you are better to get a 250 they are designed better for pulling weight engine and transmission wise
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Re: Horse Question

Postby Karen » Wed Dec 29, 2010 10:21 am

Mario, my trailer weighs 2000 lbs. My horse weighs less than 1000 lbs. My tack & water....maybe 500 lbs. I towed it around the tri-state area with my Dodge Durango for 3 years before we bought the 2nd horse and upgraded our tow vehicle. An F-150, appropriately configured, should be rated to tow close to 9000 pounds, and should be more than enough for 1 horse, as long as you don't get a living quarters trailer.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby mm » Wed Dec 29, 2010 11:48 am

I am looking at the new F150 and it has the right weight capicity for a small camper and towing for a horse and trailer. I am thinking I can sell my car, my small motor home and my old pickup and go to one new truck for everything. I am going to sell that stuff hopefully early this coming year and then see about getting a horse. Karen I am thinking of maybe leaving the horse out in NJ for at least part of the year unless I can find a good place around here. The price difference from here to NJ is a lot and I would think everything else would be more here also. I am just starting to think that if I had my own good horse I could ride and be able to run my dogs.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby GUNSMOKE » Wed Dec 29, 2010 12:51 pm

Mario I'm the guy who PM'd you. Where Karen keeps her horse is right up the street from me. Seriously come on up when you get a chance.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby Karen » Wed Dec 29, 2010 1:15 pm

Mario, if you do make the trip out, PLEASE let me know! I work 2 miles from the barn & Gunsmoke's place.

Also, we may have an old Tucker trooper saddle for sale about the time you're looking for one. I got John a Heskett Trooper for Christmas, so as long as it doesn't sore his horse, he'll be looking to get rid of the tucker. We bought it 18 months ago from an old client of Pete's.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby Griffsmom » Wed Dec 29, 2010 1:44 pm

Just remember they aren't like a vehicle that you can just let sit and then expect to jump in and go. They need to be ridden consistently to perform at athlete levels. You can't just jump on and take them to a field trial after they have not been conditioned for that much work. You also really need to learn up on how to handle situations in the field, like learning not to water when they are wringing wet with sweat, proper cool down after a long hard workout, understanding nutrition requirements for different times of the year, and types of work that they are currently performing. Even just hauling can be challenging, some like certain type of trailer (slant, stock, two horse straight load), some don't haul on certain side of the trailer, just stuff like that is just a kind of hands on learning that they entail.

I trail ride all summer and fall, and it is a job to have them in the proper condition for all types of weather and conditions. I have a quarter horse and he is 17 (had him since he was two) and still teaching me things every time we go somewhere. The best thing a person can do is just find someone who you can talk with and handles them in day to day situations and literally pick their brains for all the info you can.

So after all that I won't ever be without one in my life. The rewards out number the negatives (most of the time). I always rode like the wind when I was a kid. Got married and was fortunate that my hubby likes my horse. I got my horse when I bought a place, since then I have bought a barn, now have lots of pasture, went through two trailers (now have a 30 ft. with living 3 horse slant) and also bought a F-250 to haul the new trailer. So, you see what happens with the money when you buy one. Its worth it.

Good luck searching for one, I hope you find a good one.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby mm » Thu Dec 30, 2010 7:25 am

I will come up there before I start looking a horses for sure. As I get answers to some questions others come up. I dont want to jump into this so I am taking my time and trying to learn. How big is a hand ? I see the term used but I dont know what it transfers to in inches or feet or whatever. Also how many hands do you need, I am heavy but I saw a guy at a trial with at least 100 more pounds on him than me and he got on a horse and went. He inspired me. How much can a horse carry compared to his size and weight. I road horses before and they all seemed to do ok with me on them.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby Karen » Thu Dec 30, 2010 7:41 am

A hand is 4 inches, measured to the withers. My horse is somewhere betwween 14.3 and 15 hands. John's is around 16 hands. Rule of thumb is a horse can carry 20% of their body weight, so a 1000 lb horse can comfortably carry 200 lbs, which would include saddle & rider. But the bigger boned and shorter backed the horse, the more suited they are to carry. That means a stocky, large boned shorter horse can carry as much, if not more, than a tall, lanky, long-backed horse.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby mm » Thu Dec 30, 2010 3:29 pm

Thanks Karen for that info. What do you think is better a gelding or mare?
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Re: Horse Question

Postby Karen » Thu Dec 30, 2010 3:59 pm

Pete will say gelding between 8-13 years old that is an experienced field trial horse and to ride him at a trial before you buy, and he's right on.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby PkerStr8Tail » Fri Jan 07, 2011 9:48 pm

Be careful when you are ready to buy. Like someone else said have someone with knowledge help you. There are many tricks people use to take a hot horse and make them calm when you come look at them. You ride them, think you have the most gentle horse in the world, then you get it home and next time you ride it, it's a different horse. Giving a horse Ace is the most obvious, but I have heard of others that will last for about a week and you can't tell at all like an experienced person can tell if a horse is on Ace. Not everyone is crooked, but just beware.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby mm » Sat Jan 08, 2011 7:54 am

What is ACE some kind of drug. I saw a guy online and he had videos of his horses and he was riding them over logs and through stuff and then he starts shooting guns right off the horses back, shotguns and handguns and the horse did not care at all can this be faked. The horses were a lot of money.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby Karen » Sat Jan 08, 2011 8:20 am

Sounds like you were watching a video of Cowboy Mounted Shooting. There are PLENTY Of horses that are thoroughly gun broke, so it's likely it was real.

ACE is a mild sedative.
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Re: Horse Question

Postby tn red » Sat Jan 08, 2011 10:16 am

PkerStr8Tail wrote:Be careful when you are ready to buy. Like someone else said have someone with knowledge help you. There are many tricks people use to take a hot horse and make them calm when you come look at them. You ride them, think you have the most gentle horse in the world, then you get it home and next time you ride it, it's a different horse. Giving a horse Ace is the most obvious, but I have heard of others that will last for about a week and you can't tell at all like an experienced person can tell if a horse is on Ace. Not everyone is crooked, but just beware.


Ace,thor,rompim will not make a horse appear broke maybe calm but not broke.When you get ready to buy a horse go ride it run some dogs.Calm horses are only the begining of a broke horse.Buy a BROKE horse most anybody that really works horses will fit a new owner to the horse .
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