Tipping guides

jfwhit
Rank: Junior Hunter
Posts: 83
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:19 am
Location: Oklahoma City, OK

Tipping guides

Post by jfwhit » Mon Dec 01, 2014 10:53 pm

I am going on a guided hunt for the first time. I am wondering what a typical tip would be?

User avatar
gonehuntin'
GDF Junkie
Posts: 4563
Joined: Tue Dec 12, 2006 5:38 pm
Location: NE WI.

Re: Tipping guides

Post by gonehuntin' » Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:52 pm

It's like tipping a waitress; you only tip if they do a great job and the percentage is the same, 10-15%.

JAG06
Rank: Just A Pup
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2014 6:25 pm
Location: Albany, TX

Re: Tipping guides

Post by JAG06 » Tue Dec 02, 2014 10:10 pm

I can only comment on quail hunts, but there in my experience 50 pr hunter/day and up is average when 3 hunters +. Less than 100 tip total for the group for a days hunt would make you stand out I think (-: From friends that guide Deer hunts, when trophy animals then the tips much, much higher in dollars - but of course hunts much more expensive.

diplomat019
Rank: Senior Hunter
Posts: 151
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2013 9:04 pm
Location: New York

Re: Tipping guides

Post by diplomat019 » Wed Dec 03, 2014 5:26 pm

i been on a few hunts. the hunt was $360 for 10 birds and the guide/dog. the guide was awesome. he told us he would stay out as long as we wanted. really cool guy. we tipped $40. i know people have told me 10%. but id feel him out. if you really enjoy him and the dog, why not give him a good tip. have fun

User avatar
DonF
GDF Junkie
Posts: 3783
Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2011 6:09 pm
Location: Antelope, Ore

Re: Tipping guides

Post by DonF » Wed Dec 03, 2014 5:35 pm

I don't go on guided hunts. if i did I wouldn't tip unless the guide was exceptional. Problem with tip's is service people all seem to believe they are required, that's why they work cheap. Much better to let the outfitter pay his guides more even if you pay it and you will. The guide doesn't do a good job then he risk's losing his job. Most people i know will tip regardless of the service, I think that's insane.

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Wed Dec 03, 2014 7:29 pm

DonF wrote:I don't go on guided hunts. if i did I wouldn't tip unless the guide was exceptional. Problem with tip's is service people all seem to believe they are required, that's why they work cheap. Much better to let the outfitter pay his guides more even if you pay it and you will. The guide doesn't do a good job then he risk's losing his job. Most people i know will tip regardless of the service, I think that's insane.
One of my pet peeves also.

Mountaineer
GDF Junkie
Posts: 1630
Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 7:23 pm
Location: State?...The one where ruffed grouse were.

Re: Tipping guides

Post by Mountaineer » Wed Dec 03, 2014 8:33 pm

0% to 20% of the outlay......one must be honest and alert enough to recognize when 20% is warranted and not hold an imperfect tipping system or attitude toward tipping...against someone making a living.

User avatar
gonehuntin'
GDF Junkie
Posts: 4563
Joined: Tue Dec 12, 2006 5:38 pm
Location: NE WI.

Re: Tipping guides

Post by gonehuntin' » Thu Dec 04, 2014 6:43 am

ezzy333 wrote:
DonF wrote:I don't go on guided hunts. if i did I wouldn't tip unless the guide was exceptional. Problem with tip's is service people all seem to believe they are required, that's why they work cheap. Much better to let the outfitter pay his guides more even if you pay it and you will. The guide doesn't do a good job then he risk's losing his job. Most people i know will tip regardless of the service, I think that's insane.
One of my pet peeves also.
+1

User avatar
will-kelly
Rank: Senior Hunter
Posts: 109
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2012 10:28 pm
Location: Philadelphia Suburbs

Re: Tipping guides

Post by will-kelly » Thu Dec 04, 2014 8:33 am

gonehuntin' wrote:
ezzy333 wrote:
DonF wrote:I don't go on guided hunts. if i did I wouldn't tip unless the guide was exceptional. Problem with tip's is service people all seem to believe they are required, that's why they work cheap. Much better to let the outfitter pay his guides more even if you pay it and you will. The guide doesn't do a good job then he risk's losing his job. Most people i know will tip regardless of the service, I think that's insane.
One of my pet peeves also.
+1
I'll chime in because I guide for a local preserve. The cost for the 3 hour hunt with a guide and a dog is $275 for 10 pheasants.

Keep in mind there are many factors that play out on a hunt that will change the experience. Weather, Hunter Safety, Dog Work, Dog Handling & Shooting. Any one of these can ruin a hunt.

When I guide here's what you get:
  • A dog that has been properly trained steadily for 3+ years.(500+ Birds shot over and retrieved. 100's more missed)
    A rock solid point and a chance to shoot at no less than the 10 birds you paid for.(Often 5-10 more with hold overs from hunters that can't shoot or use untrained dogs)
    An experienced guide that knows the fields, terrain and how to handle his dog in said conditions.
    A guide that will Kill, Carry, Tag & make sure your birds are handled properly from the field to the cleaning room to your cooler.(NOTE TO OTHER GUIDES: I have noticed people shoot better when their vest isn't full of carcasses.)
    A guide that will give you advice on why you missed that last one with your first shot at 15 yards, second shot at 45 yards and that ridiculous shot you took at 80 yards.
    A guide that has plenty of orange hats and vests in the car because you forgot yours or didn't know you needed one.
    A guide that has boxes of 5's or 6's in the car because those #8 skeet loads you keep wounding them with aren't cutting it.
    A guide that will help you work all 3 hours with your 12 year old to get his first pheasant.
    A guide that will make sure your 85 year old cancer stricken father-in-law will get a pheasant or two because he loved it as a kid and this will definitely be his last hunt. They don't give him long to live.
    And finally someone who cares more about keeping your hunting party, his dog and himself safe than your tip.
These are just a few of the things you will get when you request me as your guide.

I don't guide for the money. I do it because I love to watch a dog work and the smile on the faces of the hunter when the dog brings back a cripple from 250 yards out hands it to me and turns around to go find another one. I feel very fortunate to own a great dog and have the ability to guide with her on a regular basis. The $10-$150 tips I receive help me afford this pointing dog habit I have acquired over the years.

On the original question of tipping, give what you can afford. Not a percentage of the hunt. No set amounts. I personally would rather know that a hunter gave me a $20 because that is what he can afford than a $150 tip because money is no object.

Finally the amount you tip should be a reflection of the service. I always find it funny when someone says it drives them insane when someone else does something. They do it for their own reasons. Just like a low tipping cheapskate does it for their's.

Meller
Rank: 5X Champion
Posts: 1046
Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2008 10:28 am
Location: Missouri

Re: Tipping guides

Post by Meller » Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:00 am

Good post until that last statement negated the whole post ; at least for me!

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:18 am

Meller wrote:Good post until that last statement negated the whole post ; at least for me!
Yep, real thoughts are hard to hold in.

cjhills
GDF Junkie
Posts: 2096
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 7:37 am
Location: aitkin,mn

Re: Tipping guides

Post by cjhills » Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:22 am

Willy-Kelly:
I agree with every bit of your post, including the last line.
Guides generally do not get paid a whole lot for what they do. Not the least is risking the safety of your dogs every time out. Tips are a pretty important part of their income. If you choose not to tip that is your business. If I choose not to guide your group next time out that is my business.....................Cj

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:30 am

cjhills wrote:Willy-Kelly:
I agree with every bit of your post, including the last line.
Guides generally do not get paid a whole lot for what they do. Not the least is risking the safety of your dogs every time out. Tips are a pretty important part of their income. If you choose not to tip that is your business. If I choose not to guide your group next time out that is my business.....................Cj

+ 1 Guiding is a business decision that includes a lot of pluses and minuses but in the end it is still business. Preserves pay in many cases and in others the guide contracts with the hunter. All of that should be worked out ahead of the hunt. Tipping is always optional and should be based on whether the service was above the norm. If it was tip, if it isn't don't.

Neil
GDF Junkie
Posts: 3187
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2009 12:46 pm
Location: Central Arkansas

Re: Tipping guides

Post by Neil » Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:32 am

Yep, ought to delete the last sentence.

I have only been on a couple guided hunts, and used my own dogs, still tipped 10% to 20%.

My son and I went on a 10 bird pheasant hunt with a young dog that came into her own that day. We shot and she retrieved 23 birds in a little over an hour. The owner was so peeved we over tipped because we were afraid the guide was going to get fired.

Neil

User avatar
will-kelly
Rank: Senior Hunter
Posts: 109
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2012 10:28 pm
Location: Philadelphia Suburbs

Re: Tipping guides

Post by will-kelly » Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:45 am

Meller thanks for the chuckle. Please refer to paragraph six again.

ezzy333 all of the thoughts are real, original and came from my brain.

I was originally going to add the cheapskate with the $2,500 browning that couldn't hit the side of a barn but I didn't want to offend anyone on this board directly.

I do have one more piece of advice if the last line of my other post bothers you...Make sure you hit the McDonald's drive thru on the way to the field instead of the local diner. The guy handing you the McMuffin at the drive threw doesn't expect a tip but Flo at the diner needs your money to help put her kid through Veterinary school. There's no sense in tying up the booth.

User avatar
migratesouth
Rank: Just A Pup
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2012 7:55 am
Location: NC - USA

Re: Tipping guides

Post by migratesouth » Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:56 am

A friend and I went on our first hunt in mid-October at a preserve. Each of us got an assortment of 10 birds and shared a guide for $140 each. Our guide was great and made sure our first half of the birds was on an open field as an introduction. He even set up a bird near a pond and directed out over the water on the flush so we could see the dog on a water retrieve. Our second half he took us to a more challenging area (hello trees and dense brush) and took the time to explain a bunch of things to us. When a bird flushed a little too low and we both decided not to shoot for the dog's safety - he gave us an extra bird. When we ran out of birds, we spent a little while watching the dogs work to find previous escapees. When the hunt was over, he humored our request to teach us to clean our own birds and a little about how he trains his dogs. We had no idea what to tip, so we both pitched in $40. Next time, I'll likely follow these guidelines from this post.

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Dec 04, 2014 10:26 am

will-kelly wrote:Meller thanks for the chuckle. Please refer to paragraph six again.

ezzy333 all of the thoughts are real, original and came from my brain.

I was originally going to add the cheapskate with the $2,500 browning that couldn't hit the side of a barn but I didn't want to offend anyone on this board directly.

I do have one more piece of advice if the last line of my other post bothers you...Make sure you hit the McDonald's drive thru on the way to the field instead of the local diner. The guy handing you the McMuffin at the drive threw doesn't expect a tip but Flo at the diner needs your money to help put her kid through Veterinary school. There's no sense in tying up the booth.
I don't want to start a big fight on here since we can't solve a problem, but what makes you think a tip is required? people work for a salary and tipping was nothing more than an individual liking what you provided and decided to reward you. How did it morph from a gift between two people into a requirement that everyone pays? I just have never understood that. And the saddest part of it, the offer of good will has been negated by the fact it is required plus the employers took advantage of it and lower the pay. In my mind the employers are the ones that took advantage of their employees and not the customer who has no responsibility to pay the salary of a business employee no matter how much the business is paying. Where am I wrong because I sincerely do not understand why my ability to give someone a token of appreciation has been usurpted when my charity has become a responsibility.

User avatar
DonF
GDF Junkie
Posts: 3783
Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2011 6:09 pm
Location: Antelope, Ore

Re: Tipping guides

Post by DonF » Thu Dec 04, 2014 10:30 am

will-kelly wrote:Meller thanks for the chuckle. Please refer to paragraph six again.

ezzy333 all of the thoughts are real, original and came from my brain.

I was originally going to add the cheapskate with the $2,500 browning that couldn't hit the side of a barn but I didn't want to offend anyone on this board directly.

I do have one more piece of advice if the last line of my other post bothers you...Make sure you hit the McDonald's drive thru on the way to the field instead of the local diner. The guy handing you the McMuffin at the drive threw doesn't expect a tip but Flo at the diner needs your money to help put her kid through Veterinary school. There's no sense in tying up the booth.
Why don't you just charge what you believe your service's are worth and don't rely on tipping? People that always tip are going to tip regardless of the service. People that only tip for exceptional service will still tip if the service is exceptional! What you seem to be saying is your giving excellent service at a cut rate hoping for a good tip. Why don't you sell your service for what it's really worth And except a tip as a bonus for what the customer feels was exceptional service. Gotta tell ya, the people that always tip will still tip, they think it's required! Those that believe they got exceptional service will still tip also. But don't offer a cut rate in hope's of getting customer's tip's to make up the difference!

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Dec 04, 2014 10:32 am

will-kelly wrote:Meller thanks for the chuckle. Please refer to paragraph six again.

ezzy333 all of the thoughts are real, original and came from my brain.

I was originally going to add the cheapskate with the $2,500 browning that couldn't hit the side of a barn but I didn't want to offend anyone on this board directly.

I do have one more piece of advice if the last line of my other post bothers you...Make sure you hit the McDonald's drive thru on the way to the field instead of the local diner. The guy handing you the McMuffin at the drive threw doesn't expect a tip but Flo at the diner needs your money to help put her kid through Veterinary school. There's no sense in tying up the booth.
I don't want to start a big fight on here since we can't solve a problem, but what makes you think a tip is required? People work for a salary and tipping was nothing more than an individual liking what you provided and decided to reward you. How did it morph from a gift between two people into a requirement that everyone pays? I just have never understood that. And the saddest part of it, the offer of good will has been negated by the fact it is required plus the employers took advantage of it and lowered the pay. In my mind the employers are the ones that took advantage of their employees and not the customer who has no responsibility to pay the salary of a business employee no matter how much the business is paying. Where am I wrong because I sincerely do not understand why my ability to give someone a token of appreciation has been usurped and made my charity a responsibility.

Does this mean I will soon be required to give birthday presents as well as Christmas present? and will I also have to give to families who have lost a member a certain amount to the organization of their choice? I see the day coming.

Mountaineer
GDF Junkie
Posts: 1630
Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 7:23 pm
Location: State?...The one where ruffed grouse were.

Re: Tipping guides

Post by Mountaineer » Thu Dec 04, 2014 10:35 am

As usual, opposition or favor is based upon either experience or the luxury of distance.

I have tipped one waterfowl guide in KY well as he deserved it...on the other hand a goose guide in NJ did not and he got nothing....plus, he was shooting lead, in non-lead times, as I found out when I snatched up one of his empties.
Two opposite experiences that even taken alone would be no sound basis for any action on another day...still, folks often look for excuses for their decisions and actions or hold the next guy to a past guy's actions.
Mostly, because they are simply opposed to tipping and, supposedly, wish some employer would pay better.
Of course, not all guides work for an outfitter...but, who cares about possibilities and realities....it's time to head for home with some dead birds or whatever.

Never had any experience with a guide for upland birds.....hope I never do but, I do hope I will be mature enough to tip as the day demands if that lightning ever strikes.
Tipping is not as much a requirement as a rateable thank you....small taters, in reality.

User avatar
Vonzeppelinkennels
GDF Junkie
Posts: 2079
Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2010 9:14 pm
Location: Amelia,Ohio

Re: Tipping guides

Post by Vonzeppelinkennels » Thu Dec 04, 2014 11:24 am

To some everything is about the money & if guiding upland hunts is for the money first & foremost I doubt your clients will enjoy it much! The best guides are ones that enjoy the dogs,their clients,& the hunt,any monetary rewards are just icing on the cake so to speak. :D
Not pointing any fingers but you know who you are!! :roll:

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Dec 04, 2014 12:26 pm

I have done a little guiding in the past and the greatest gift is to see the smiles and excitement on the faces of the patrons. With out that display of satisfaction I have never guided for those people again. But as far as tipping, I am talking about the act itself and how it changed from a gift to commitment.

User avatar
will-kelly
Rank: Senior Hunter
Posts: 109
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2012 10:28 pm
Location: Philadelphia Suburbs

Re: Tipping guides

Post by will-kelly » Thu Dec 04, 2014 12:35 pm

DonF wrote: Why don't you just charge what you believe your service's are worth and don't rely on tipping?
Who said guides rely on tipping? I missed that in my post.
People that always tip are going to tip regardless of the service. People that only tip for exceptional service will still tip if the service is exceptional!
I can tell you have no experience in a service industry. Buy hey arm chair quarterbacking is why we all watch the NFL.
What you seem to be saying is your giving excellent service at a cut rate hoping for a good tip.
Again I missed this in my post. I thought I was pretty clear but by your response I must have confused you.
Why don't you sell your service for what it's really worth And except a tip as a bonus for what the customer feels was exceptional service.


Assumptions will get you nowhere. I charge appropriately but I guess you misread the part about me feeling fortunate. I believe you meant accept not except.
Gotta tell ya, the people that always tip will still tip, they think it's required!
Gotta tell ya, when someone "always" does something you don't have to follow it up with the "will still" thing. Always is an absolute. That is what the word means. Maybe something like...People that think tipping is required will always tip. :D
Those that believe they got exceptional service will still tip also.
You are completely wrong on this one. Not everyone can afford to tip. Everyone I guide for gets the same service. I don't work for the tip. The dog however hates crappy tippers but we are working on it.
But don't offer a cut rate in hope's of getting customer's tip's to make up the difference!


It would be amazing if you really knew who you were talking about and what you were talking about.

Thanks for the business advice however. I'll let all of the other guides know we've been doing it all wrong.

User avatar
will-kelly
Rank: Senior Hunter
Posts: 109
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2012 10:28 pm
Location: Philadelphia Suburbs

Re: Tipping guides

Post by will-kelly » Thu Dec 04, 2014 12:44 pm

ezzy333 wrote:I have done a little guiding in the past and the greatest gift is to see the smiles and excitement on the faces of the patrons. With out that display of satisfaction I have never guided for those people again. But as far as tipping, I am talking about the act itself and how it changed from a gift to commitment.
You are in luck Ezzy. Next time you are in the Philly area this place doesn't allow tipping. http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/the- ... lowed.html

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Dec 04, 2014 1:01 pm

The best Steak House in Wisconsin doesn't allow it either. Not sure what that has to do with the tipping guides for Guiders though.

taxidermy
Rank: Senior Hunter
Posts: 148
Joined: Thu Dec 04, 2008 10:10 am
Location: colorado

Re: Tipping guides

Post by taxidermy » Thu Dec 04, 2014 1:15 pm

I would never tip or, for that matter go on a put-and-take-string hunt but, i would tip the 50-$100+gas and dinner on a wild hunt !

cjhills
GDF Junkie
Posts: 2096
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 7:37 am
Location: aitkin,mn

Re: Tipping guides

Post by cjhills » Thu Dec 04, 2014 1:32 pm

ezzy333 wrote:I have done a little guiding in the past and the greatest gift is to see the smiles and excitement on the faces of the patrons. With out that display of satisfaction I have never guided for those people again. But as far as tipping, I am talking about the act itself and how it changed from a gift to commitment.
That is all very nice, but if you think you can feed your dogs and yourself, buy gas and all the other expenses connected with guiding with smiles and excitement you are in for a surprise.
If you guide for a living you will find that everyone is not there to see dogs work and you will guide some people with serious attitudes that you really don't like very much but you treat them decent because you represent the lodge where you are guiding and providing a service. People who want the guide service should tip the guide. They can't survive without it. The amount you tip is up to you but 10 to 15 % should be the minimum. The guides quickly learn who the cheapskates are.
I do not know how it changed from a gift to a commitment, but that is what it is for people in the service industries. Waitress have taxes withheld base on their sales at 15% so if you tip 10% they lose money on your tip....................Cj

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Dec 04, 2014 2:02 pm

Are you sure that doesn't read 15% unless you keep track of them. Besides most waitresses have no idea how much her sales are since she is just serving. But to get back to the basic problem why is the customer responsible for paying the help in a restaurant but not is a store, car dealership, clothing store, or here on line. I am not making a living wage on the forum though I have worked here for ten years. One of the things I always checked on before accepting a job is what will I be paid and it was my job to decide if it was enough to live on.

Ezzy

rinker
Rank: 4X Champion
Posts: 666
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2011 9:01 am

Re: Tipping guides

Post by rinker » Thu Dec 04, 2014 2:39 pm

I have been on two hunts that involved a guide. There were several guys in the group and we each threw in $20, for the tip. I actually do not even know how to calculate the percentage that this represents. It would be about 20% of the total price of the hunt plus the guides fee. It would be closer to 100% of the guides fee.

I don't know who made the rules as to what type of service jobs get tipped and what kind do not. I do my best to tip generously at all times. I actually do not ever remember withholding a tip due to poor service, I just don't go back to places where I have received poor service.

Meller
Rank: 5X Champion
Posts: 1046
Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2008 10:28 am
Location: Missouri

Re: Tipping guides

Post by Meller » Thu Dec 04, 2014 5:19 pm

Will-Kelly
This will be my last post on this subject; My reading and comprehension are not a problem, and yes I went back and reread paragraph 6.
Let me quote you; (I don't guide for the money, I would rather know that a hunter gave me $20. because that is what he could afford, rather than the $150. because money is not a problem) at this point it was a very commendable post, I feel that it went astray and discredited the whole post with this statement
(just like a low tipping cheapskate does it for theirs) There may be several reasons why the person you described didn't tip you and I'm not about to guess why. And I am not going to try to tell how much money a person has or what he can afford by what he is wearing or shooting, a lot of people have been handed down some real nice firearms from family members; some have saved all their lives for that once in a lifetime hunt, I don't think I need to judge. But I will tell you in my opinion that you sir discredited yourself by that last statement!

User avatar
will-kelly
Rank: Senior Hunter
Posts: 109
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2012 10:28 pm
Location: Philadelphia Suburbs

Re: Tipping guides

Post by will-kelly » Thu Dec 04, 2014 5:30 pm

Thanks again Meller.

A twofer!

jfwhit
Rank: Junior Hunter
Posts: 83
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:19 am
Location: Oklahoma City, OK

Re: Tipping guides

Post by jfwhit » Thu Dec 04, 2014 5:36 pm

I get the whole tipping problem. Why it started, we'll never know. Don't see it stopping.

I asked the question because I have never done a guided hunt. I have always hunted wild quail. I hunted a lot in the 80's, 90's, and early to mid 2000's. Took a break due to dog dying, job, growing kids, $$, etc. Last year I picked up a Brittany. Had him trained. And now get out about twice a week on public land. My son and I enjoy prefer the wild hunt. However, I want my dog to get a good full day of bird work. I know it doesn't compare to wild birds. Also I have brothers, nephews, friend, etc. that I want them to enjoy a quail hunt that have never gone. I'd like to see my young nephews get the bug. I feel like I'm taking them to a stocked pond so-to-speak. So I checked into my options for guided or planted facilities. I have booked three over the course of the month. The prices vary depending on their services. $80 per gun to $325 per gun. And these were the cheaper ones. I don't expect to do this too often. Just wanting to spark an interest in my circle other than just myself. These places I chose, the guides own the ranches and do the whole thing themselves. The tip amounts could vary greatly if doing a % thing. Still will most likely play it by ear to see how well, or not, it goes.

Thanks for all the input. I wanted to hear from people who have done it and those who guide. I think you guys offer a great service and do really care more about the experience offered and not the money.

User avatar
gonehuntin'
GDF Junkie
Posts: 4563
Joined: Tue Dec 12, 2006 5:38 pm
Location: NE WI.

Re: Tipping guides

Post by gonehuntin' » Thu Dec 04, 2014 6:04 pm

Here's the thing with wil-kelly's post; those are the things guides should do anyhow. Why do they think they're getting the money they do? I don't see anything in his post, other than giving some hunters the right shells, that every good guide doesn't do. As far as supplying vests, that is the responsibility of the preserve he's guiding on. If he were on his own, no preserve, that would be another matter. With most preserves they sell the hats, vest, shells, caps if needed right there; it's an extra source of income. If a guide supplies them, he is cutting the preserve out of money.

Whole post is sour grapes in my opinion.

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Dec 04, 2014 6:54 pm

Guess I will just come out an say what I think and then be done with it. There is no valid guide lines on tipping since tipping is a voluntary thing that is unique to each individual. You tip whatever you feel like tipping and there is no good reason you should ever feel bad about what you tipped since it is voluntary and depends on nothing more than what you feel is right. This is just another area where someone else is trying to tell you how to spend your money.

And one other thing that I alluded to before. There are many ways to tip besides with money. a smile, a hug, a handshake, or a compliment in front of others are all good and many times are needed worse than a few coins plus providing memories for a life time.

Ezzy

User avatar
Donnytpburge
Rank: Senior Hunter
Posts: 158
Joined: Sun Jul 21, 2013 9:16 am
Location: Mississippi

Re: Tipping guides

Post by Donnytpburge » Fri Dec 05, 2014 11:45 am

I guide with my dogs at a plantation.
I appreciate a tip when it's offered and will remember the hunter that gives it the next time he is there.

db

CCBIRDDOGMAN
Rank: Senior Hunter
Posts: 162
Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2011 9:38 am
Location: Cedar Creek Lake, TX

Re: Tipping guides

Post by CCBIRDDOGMAN » Fri Dec 05, 2014 2:58 pm

I'm guiding a group of four tomorrow. My first time to ever guide. It's a put & take hunt at a preserve. I am only going for the dog training (headed to our lease in Oklahoma next weekend for wild birds). Do I hope I get a tip? yes. Will I be mad if I dont get one? no. I just hope they aren't rude and of course I hope my dogs stay safe.

Moulders Farm
Rank: Junior Hunter
Posts: 91
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2012 12:58 pm
Location: Mo.

Re: Tipping guides

Post by Moulders Farm » Fri Dec 05, 2014 4:27 pm

I have only gided a couple of time & I was not doing it for the money , I though it saved me money for some one else buy the birds & my dogs get a great work out . How ever they tipped me & that payed My gas bill but i was not doing it for a living . But where does it stop last night on the News they reported A big named rest. was adding a place for The cooks & kitchen help as well as a tip for the waiter because they were having trouble keeping good help My though was the buss. needed to give them a raise . I guess I am to old I like others thank tipping is for some one doing thing extra for me . Not a require ment

User avatar
gonehuntin'
GDF Junkie
Posts: 4563
Joined: Tue Dec 12, 2006 5:38 pm
Location: NE WI.

Re: Tipping guides

Post by gonehuntin' » Fri Dec 05, 2014 4:37 pm

CCBIRDDOGMAN wrote:I'm guiding a group of four tomorrow. My first time to ever guide. It's a put & take hunt at a preserve. I am only going for the dog training (headed to our lease in Oklahoma next weekend for wild birds). Do I hope I get a tip? yes. Will I be mad if I dont get one? no. I just hope they aren't rude and of course I hope my dogs stay safe.
Make certain they thoroughly understand YOUR rules of when a bird is to be shot. No birds under the horizon. At the flush, watch your dog's and watch the shooters and be ready to scream a safety if needed.

Waterdogs1
Rank: Senior Hunter
Posts: 110
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 10:32 am
Location: Nampa Idaho

Re: Tipping guides

Post by Waterdogs1 » Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:08 am

The better lodges have a hundred dollars a day tip per gun and it goes down from their. That is on top of a wage from the lodge. You are taking all that risk with your dogs and someone getting shot being in the field with who knows who.

cjhills
GDF Junkie
Posts: 2096
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 7:37 am
Location: aitkin,mn

Re: Tipping guides

Post by cjhills » Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:15 am

Rule No.1 Don't shoot the dogs
Rule No.2 Don't shoot the guide
If you break rule no.1 you better break rule no.2

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:44 am

Waterdogs1 wrote:The better lodges have a hundred dollars a day tip per gun and it goes down from their. That is on top of a wage from the lodge. You are taking all that risk with your dogs and someone getting shot being in the field with who knows who.
Problem is it is no longer a tip when it is required, it is wages that they require the customer to pay. By definition, a tip is a gratuity and not a wage. That's why I do not ever go back to any place that includes the "tip" on the bill. And I don't feel like I am taking or causing any undo risk with or to anyone.

jfwhit
Rank: Junior Hunter
Posts: 83
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:19 am
Location: Oklahoma City, OK

Re: Tipping guides

Post by jfwhit » Sun Dec 07, 2014 12:04 pm

For what is worth. We had an awesome time. Small operation. Owner was the guide. We had great dog work. My dog got a great workout. Birds flew hard and long (due to my superb ability to miss). Price was $80 per gun. We tipped $20 per gun. He didn't seem to be "expecting" it. His goal (as it should be) was to give us an awesome hunting experience with a lot of action. Several coveys were there due to many previous hunts. We shot clay targets for no extra fee and he cleaned the game.

Bottom line... We had a great day. My son had lots of fun. He's still talking about it. I felt it was a great gift. Wish I could have tipped more. Most likely could've if not for time of year. Christmas time, etc. This was what we wanted for this day.

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Sun Dec 07, 2014 12:23 pm

jfwhit wrote:For what is worth. We had an awesome time. Small operation. Owner was the guide. We had great dog work. My dog got a great workout. Birds flew hard and long (due to my superb ability to miss). Price was $80 per gun. We tipped $20 per gun. He didn't seem to be "expecting" it. His goal (as it should be) was to give us an awesome hunting experience with a lot of action. Several coveys were there due to many previous hunts. We shot clay targets for no extra fee and he cleaned the game.

Bottom line... We had a great day. My son had lots of fun. He's still talking about it. I felt it was a great gift. Wish I could have tipped more. Most likely could've if not for time of year. Christmas time, etc. This was what we wanted for this day.
And this is exactly as it should be, an expression of personal gratitude to someone that provided a service that was special due to his hard work and caring.

User avatar
gonehuntin'
GDF Junkie
Posts: 4563
Joined: Tue Dec 12, 2006 5:38 pm
Location: NE WI.

Re: Tipping guides

Post by gonehuntin' » Sun Dec 07, 2014 7:20 pm

Some seem to have the idea that everything a guide does is an extra. It isn't. In order to be a guide he needs trained dog's. That's a cost of being employed. The other stuff, carrying birds, working the dog's, knowing
ezzy333 wrote:
jfwhit wrote:For what is worth. We had an awesome time. Small operation. Owner was the guide. We had great dog work. My dog got a great workout. Birds flew hard and long (due to my superb ability to miss). Price was $80 per gun. We tipped $20 per gun. He didn't seem to be "expecting" it. His goal (as it should be) was to give us an awesome hunting experience with a lot of action. Several coveys were there due to many previous hunts. We shot clay targets for no extra fee and he cleaned the game.

Bottom line... We had a great day. My son had lots of fun. He's still talking about it. I felt it was a great gift. Wish I could have tipped more. Most likely could've if not for time of year. Christmas time, etc. This was what we wanted for this day.
And this is exactly as it should be, an expression of personal gratitude to someone that provided a service that was special due to his hard work and caring.
Having trained dog's, being friendly with clients, helping them in the field, carrying birds are things a guide is expected and paid to do. If he want's to be a guide, he has overhead and responsibility. I personally think a tip of 100.00 a day per gun is ludicrous and yes, I once did guide, and train.

jfwhit
Rank: Junior Hunter
Posts: 83
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:19 am
Location: Oklahoma City, OK

Re: Tipping guides

Post by jfwhit » Sun Dec 07, 2014 9:00 pm

gonehuntin' wrote:Some seem to have the idea that everything a guide does is an extra. It isn't. In order to be a guide he needs trained dog's. That's a cost of being employed. The other stuff, carrying birds, working the dog's, knowing
ezzy333 wrote:
jfwhit wrote:For what is worth. We had an awesome time. Small operation. Owner was the guide. We had great dog work. My dog got a great workout. Birds flew hard and long (due to my superb ability to miss). Price was $80 per gun. We tipped $20 per gun. He didn't seem to be "expecting" it. His goal (as it should be) was to give us an awesome hunting experience with a lot of action. Several coveys were there due to many previous hunts. We shot clay targets for no extra fee and he cleaned the game.

Bottom line... We had a great day. My son had lots of fun. He's still talking about it. I felt it was a great gift. Wish I could have tipped more. Most likely could've if not for time of year. Christmas time, etc. This was what we wanted for this day.
And this is exactly as it should be, an expression of personal gratitude to someone that provided a service that was special due to his hard work and caring.
Having trained dog's, being friendly with clients, helping them in the field, carrying birds are things a guide is expected and paid to do. If he want's to be a guide, he has overhead and responsibility. I personally think a tip of 100.00 a day per gun is ludicrous and yes, I once did guide, and train.
I agree. He did what I was expecting a guide to do. I paid for a guide service and was expecting nothing less than what I got. I would've been fine with not tipping. And maybe he would've been also. As with say, a waiter, I have general expectations. When I think something extra was done(whatever that may be), or an attitude was appreciated, I like to "reward" the person. Not only did he help me work my dog, he also offered advice and helped me see things I wasn't able to see. When he added his dogs, we got in some backing and multiple different points. He even wound up in a cedar tree due to an unusual fallen bird. Also, it's enjoyable talking shop with someone in the know as opposed to most in my crowd.

JAG06
Rank: Just A Pup
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2014 6:25 pm
Location: Albany, TX

Re: Tipping guides

Post by JAG06 » Sun Dec 07, 2014 9:26 pm

I just have to say that the attitudes displayed in this thread is in my experience not representative for the hunters I guide for. In general quail hunters are educated about what they are doing, appreciative, polite and courteous.

User avatar
AZ Brittany Guy
Rank: 5X Champion
Posts: 1413
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2005 8:00 pm
Location: Arizona

Re: Tipping guides

Post by AZ Brittany Guy » Mon Dec 08, 2014 9:47 am

Interesting thread. A guide provides a service like all other people in the service industry. We live in a free country (even though some are trying to take that away). A guide does not provide a product (its up to you to shoot the product) he guides you to where the product is. Example: If you don't like to tip, go to the store, buy your steak, cook it and eat it voila no tip necessary. If you don't like to tip, don't get a guide, go find a place to hunt, tromp around the field and hope you find a bird. Some people aren't really guides, they are good well intended people that are out their for the hunting experience just like you are. They just want to work their dogs and have a good time just like you. You can put me in that category as I never expected any tip when I used to go to a preserve close to my home to work my dogs. (I think that's who a few of these posters are looking for). A real guide is like the waiter / waitress who needs to put a roof over their head and help take care of a family. They are good a what they do and they do it everyday. They may enjoy it but it is not a hobby, its a job. Being in the Hospitality business all my life I can tell you I have heard some doozies how people expect to get something for nothing. How much is your time worth? How much would you need to charge to spend your day doing something for others? It costs what it costs to run a business and you charge what you need to charge to make a living. Call it what you want, flat fee, 1/2 day - full day rates or TIPs, your going to have to pay enough to make it worth the person's time to do things for you. They guy who wants his customers to tip his kitchen staff is a weak manager who allows his kitchen help influence him. I predict that restaurant will be out of business soon. Tipping has been around for hundreds of years. How did it get started? Who knows, maybe when people wanted other people to start doing things for them rather than doing them for themselves.

"I may be wrong...but I always have an opinion " :mrgreen:

User avatar
ezzy333
GDF Junkie
Posts: 16646
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:14 pm
Location: Dixon IL

Re: Tipping guides

Post by ezzy333 » Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:28 am

How did tipping get started? Very probably the way it still should be. Someone felt like giving someone else a token of his appreciation for something that someone did. It wasn't a wage, or expected, it wasn't anything other than a nice way of saying you went out of your way to provide something more than your job requires and I appreciate it. Nothing less or nothing less, just my way of thanking you for something you did for me. If restaurants die it will be because they didn't pay their help a living wage and their employees moved on to something better. But if it is because the customer's didn't tip after paying a bill that covers the service they received then they should die. Tips are my way of saying thank you and no one has the right to tell me I have to pay it. If they feel they do, then put it on the menu what the cost is and not try to tell me I have to give. Giving means you freely giving someone something of yours and in no way says you owe it. That is what the price includes. Tipping today has been usurped by the service provider as a bill I owe because they are noy paying their employees and I do not like the fact that they are taking away my right to tip when I want to.

CCBIRDDOGMAN
Rank: Senior Hunter
Posts: 162
Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2011 9:38 am
Location: Cedar Creek Lake, TX

Re: Tipping guides

Post by CCBIRDDOGMAN » Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:40 am

I must have done pretty good. They tipped me $100.

User avatar
AZ Brittany Guy
Rank: 5X Champion
Posts: 1413
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2005 8:00 pm
Location: Arizona

Re: Tipping guides

Post by AZ Brittany Guy » Mon Dec 08, 2014 11:30 am

If Obama came out with an executive order that TIPs would no longer be allowed in any business but you could give the service provider a "nice thank you card" instead, I assure you the prices of birds would go up at Game Preserves, food and drink would rise dramatically at restaurants and greens fees would rise at golf courses. That's not gonna happen.....at least I don't think so....who knows with Obama. Game Preserves vs Hunting....two different animals. Wild bird guide different yet from the Game Preserves. A sincere "Thank You" and $5 tip are not going to work with a guy that has been schlepping a once a year bird shooter around for several hours. No offence to anyone here on the forum but how would you feel if the tables were turned.

Rick and Ronnie Smith were / are guides at Mariposa Ranch in South Texas. What would you expect to tip them if they drug out a couple of dogs had helped you find birds and for some reason you didn't like the way they looked at you or you got up on the wrong side of the bed that morning? Truth be known their are a lot of people that make more money than a Rock Star that love wing shooting and they are not going to squirm over a TIP. If I have service that stinks, I call the owner / manager over immediately and tell them things aren't going well and give them a chance to nip it in the bud. If I don't tip and on rare occasion its that bad, everyone in the place knows about it from the bus boy to the server to the manager. As a manager, I would want to know.

I know what its like to be a server, a bartender and a guy that carries someone's golf bag around and that is why I am a 20% tipper. In those day's I did my level best to give great service with a smile because my lively hood depended on it. We can complain about tipping until the cows come home but it's not gonna change in the foreseeable future. As a side note, back in the day as a waiter you had to pay the Service Director $10-20K to get a servers or doorman's job in the best houses in Las Vegas.

Other than that.......I don't have a real strong opinion about it. :mrgreen:

Post Reply