Iditarod Dog Breeds

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Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Neil » Mon Nov 09, 2015 9:41 am

I have a lot of respect for the dogs and mushers of sled dog racing, and have followed their exploits since the 1960's. However, there is a good bit of misinformation repeated here.

There is no registry for the dogs, no such thing as a purebred sled dog, the dogs are qualified on looks.

Here is one of many interesting articles on the dogs:

http://peninsulaclarion.com/stories/022 ... kCwcODnYv4


Bob Wehle of Elhew fame competed successfully in the New York area regional events, GSPs compete in Europe and are cross bred here, standard poodles have completed the Iditarod many times, as did a team of Irish setters.

The dogs are well cared for; given bedding, coats, and blankets to protect them from the elements. But in many years there is more mud than snow, with moderate temperatures. The dogs pull very little weight, with many mushers running most of the way.

I think it appropriate that they want to preserve tradition and restrict the entrants to proper looking dogs, but I have no doubt All-Age pointers would preform very well most years. I know the strength and speed they possess is unmatched.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Neil » Mon Nov 09, 2015 10:06 am

The “marathon” runners—including dogs running in the Iditarod—have some border collie, hound, or pointer mixed in, says Stuart Nelson, Jr., head veterinarian for the Iditarod.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Trekmoor » Wed Nov 11, 2015 6:14 pm

You have just bust my little internal vision of the Iditarod dogs wide open. Ever since I was a boy and read a couple of Jack London's books I have fancied running along behind a team of really good dogs bred to withstand the frozen north .......fat chance of that now by the sounds of it.

What's next I wonder in the name of speed ? Greyhounds competing in retriever trials maybe ?

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by polmaise » Wed Nov 11, 2015 6:24 pm

Neil wrote:
The “marathon” runners—including dogs running in the Iditarod—have some border collie, hound, or pointer mixed in, says Stuart Nelson, Jr., head veterinarian for the Iditarod.
In 'Arkansas' ?
That would be cool !..Like running a coon hound at the Waterloo cup .

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Vision » Thu Nov 12, 2015 9:05 am

This is why pointers don't work for the Iditiarod
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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Brazosvalleyvizslas » Thu Nov 12, 2015 1:03 pm

It gets cold in Germany and Hungary.....Pointers would do just fine and are often cross bred to make sled dogs.

I have a Vizsla from Canada and a GSP from N. Dakota. Both were kennel dogs and lived outdoors. They now live in South Texas and have adjusted to the heat just fine.

Neil has it right.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by MJB64 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 1:29 pm

Brazosvalleyvizslas wrote:It gets cold in Germany and Hungary.....Pointers would do just fine and are often cross bred to make sled dogs.

I have a Vizsla from Canada and a GSP from N. Dakota. Both were kennel dogs and lived outdoors. They now live in South Texas and have adjusted to the heat just fine.

Neil has it right.
Did they live outdoors on top of a pile of straw? I don't think so.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Brazosvalleyvizslas » Thu Nov 12, 2015 1:37 pm

MJB64 wrote:
Brazosvalleyvizslas wrote:It gets cold in Germany and Hungary.....Pointers would do just fine and are often cross bred to make sled dogs.

I have a Vizsla from Canada and a GSP from N. Dakota. Both were kennel dogs and lived outdoors. They now live in South Texas and have adjusted to the heat just fine.

Neil has it right.
Did they live outdoors on top of a pile of straw? I don't think so.

Mike
No straw in either case, just bare ground! Whats your point? Did they live on straw several hundreds of years ago? I don't think so!!!!!

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Spy Car » Thu Nov 12, 2015 1:50 pm

Non-Northern (appearing) breeds have been banned from the Iditarod for more than 20 years in any case. Show up with a Vizsla, Pointer, or Poodle and you'll be bounced.

Not to say sled-dog folks aren't mixing in other breeds through outcrossing, but they still have to pass a "looks like a Northern breed" test. A dog with no undercoat (like a Vizsla) would be out.

There are marketing reasons for this, as referenced by "Jack London" expectations upthread.

Aslo don't underestimate the pressure from "antis" who are trying to shut down dogsled racing as "cruel," they would have a field day with a Vizsla team freezing in the cold. The "these dogs were bred for this" argument would vanish, and hurt the sport.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by MJB64 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 2:09 pm

Brazosvalleyvizslas wrote:
MJB64 wrote:
Brazosvalleyvizslas wrote:It gets cold in Germany and Hungary.....Pointers would do just fine and are often cross bred to make sled dogs.

I have a Vizsla from Canada and a GSP from N. Dakota. Both were kennel dogs and lived outdoors. They now live in South Texas and have adjusted to the heat just fine.

Neil has it right.
Did they live outdoors on top of a pile of straw? I don't think so.

Mike
No straw in either case, just bare ground! Whats your point? Did they live on straw several hundreds of years ago? I don't think so!!!!!
My point is that I don't think that you will find many Vizslas living through a Canadian winter without proper shelter. Bare ground in the winter? Who would do that?

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 2:17 pm

Amen, very hard to get a V dog through the winters here with out a very good house or a little heat.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Brazosvalleyvizslas » Thu Nov 12, 2015 2:23 pm

ezzy333 wrote:Amen, very hard to get a V dog through the winters here with out a very good house or a little heat.
Its done every day. I think the S.E. Texas is more brutal. We have to make sure that they are cool enough.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by MJB64 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 2:47 pm

Brazosvalleyvizslas wrote:
ezzy333 wrote:Amen, very hard to get a V dog through the winters here with out a very good house or a little heat.
Its done every day. I think the S.E. Texas is more brutal. We have to make sure that they are cool enough.
I think that I would want to here from some of the Canadians to see if it is "done every day" up there. I would not have a V live outdoors without shelter in Minnesota.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by slistoe » Thu Nov 12, 2015 2:49 pm

ezzy333 wrote:Amen, very hard to get a V dog through the winters here with out a very good house or a little heat.
I have never owned a Viszla. Do they have less coat than a GSP or EP? The ones I have seen didn't appear to have any less coat. All you guys carrying on about how hard it is to winter a dog and you don't really have WINTER. It is entirely possible to keep GSP's and EP's outside through almost all that winter can dish out around these parts. Most folks go soft on their dogs when it gets to -30 degrees and bring them in, but in reality if they have adequate feed and somewhere to get out of the wind they would survive quite fine for much colder than that.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 2:58 pm

Yes, they seem to have less cpat and of course less body mass, O have has a couple of males that were heavier do pretty well with a good house but have had to provide heat for a couple of smaller females. And I know several people from MN that will not leave them out without heat as they have had problems with it.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by MJB64 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 2:59 pm

slistoe wrote:
ezzy333 wrote:Amen, very hard to get a V dog through the winters here with out a very good house or a little heat.
I have never owned a Viszla. Do they have less coat than a GSP or EP? The ones I have seen didn't appear to have any less coat. All you guys carrying on about how hard it is to winter a dog and you don't really have WINTER. It is entirely possible to keep GSP's and EP's outside through almost all that winter can dish out around these parts. Most folks go soft on their dogs when it gets to -30 degrees and bring them in, but in reality if they have adequate feed and somewhere to get out of the wind they would survive quite fine for much colder than that.
I am pretty sure that I have winter. You need to read back to the "bare ground" comment. That is the one that I don't believe.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Neil » Thu Nov 12, 2015 3:05 pm

The Iditarod dogs' care is supervised by an army of veterinarians, the mushers carry bedding, blankets, tarps, and coats. They are wonderfully capable dogs, deserving of respect.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Spy Car » Thu Nov 12, 2015 3:14 pm

Neil wrote:The Iditarod dogs' care is supervised by an army of veterinarians, the mushers carry bedding, blankets, tarps, and coats. They are wonderfully capable dogs, deserving of respect.

And still there are howls of protest. Add thin-coated Vizslas (with zero-undercoat) to the mix and the so-called animal rights groups would pounce.

Bill (Vizsla owner from the land of no winters)

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by slistoe » Thu Nov 12, 2015 3:32 pm

MJB64 wrote:
slistoe wrote:
ezzy333 wrote:Amen, very hard to get a V dog through the winters here with out a very good house or a little heat.
I have never owned a Viszla. Do they have less coat than a GSP or EP? The ones I have seen didn't appear to have any less coat. All you guys carrying on about how hard it is to winter a dog and you don't really have WINTER. It is entirely possible to keep GSP's and EP's outside through almost all that winter can dish out around these parts. Most folks go soft on their dogs when it gets to -30 degrees and bring them in, but in reality if they have adequate feed and somewhere to get out of the wind they would survive quite fine for much colder than that.
I am pretty sure that I have winter. You need to read back to the "bare ground" comment. That is the one that I don't believe.

Mike
Believe it or not, it is rather pointless as the sled dogs don't sleep on bare ground either, do they. But, if they are given a place out of the wind they will likely do quite fine.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by slistoe » Thu Nov 12, 2015 3:37 pm

Spy Car wrote:
Neil wrote:The Iditarod dogs' care is supervised by an army of veterinarians, the mushers carry bedding, blankets, tarps, and coats. They are wonderfully capable dogs, deserving of respect.

And still there are howls of protest. Add thin-coated Vizslas (with zero-undercoat) to the mix and the so-called animal rights groups would pounce.

Bill (Vizsla owner from the land of no winters)
Animal Rights Groups are always pouncing because they can find sympathy with all sorts of folks who react emotionally and use zero brain function. Kind of like those with irrational fears to some feed types, etc. Emotional reaction that AR groups can feed on. They are always looking, and saying we can't do this or that for fear of offending them is another irrational, emotional reaction - because they will be offended regardless of what you do or don't do.

Anyway, no one is seriously considering sending Viszlas onto the sled dog racing circuit anyway - what would be the point. But if you are talking EP's - they have no trouble living outdoors in the cold and they could more than likely give the sled dog breeds a serious run.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Spy Car » Thu Nov 12, 2015 3:55 pm

slistoe wrote:
Spy Car wrote:
Neil wrote:The Iditarod dogs' care is supervised by an army of veterinarians, the mushers carry bedding, blankets, tarps, and coats. They are wonderfully capable dogs, deserving of respect.

And still there are howls of protest. Add thin-coated Vizslas (with zero-undercoat) to the mix and the so-called animal rights groups would pounce.

Bill (Vizsla owner from the land of no winters)
Animal Rights Groups are always pouncing because they can find sympathy with all sorts of folks who react emotionally and use zero brain function. Kind of like those with irrational fears to some feed types, etc. Emotional reaction that AR groups can feed on. They are always looking, and saying we can't do this or that for fear of offending them is another irrational, emotional reaction - because they will be offended regardless of what you do or don't do.

Anyway, no one is seriously considering sending Viszlas onto the sled dog racing circuit anyway - what would be the point. But if you are talking EP's - they have no trouble living outdoors in the cold and they could more than likely give the sled dog breeds a serious run.
Well, using sled-dogs that resemble wolves, that were bred as Northern breeds, that have dense coats and thick insulting under-coats gives mushers a legitimate point on which they can push back. Vizslas? Not so much.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by slistoe » Thu Nov 12, 2015 3:59 pm

I thought we had discounted the Viszla already.

The race is monitored by scores of competent people. If the dogs are examined and declared fit to compete no further push back is needed. Your thought process is pandering to their agenda.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Spy Car » Thu Nov 12, 2015 4:10 pm

slistoe wrote:I thought we had discounted the Viszla already.

The race is monitored by scores of competent people. If the dogs are examined and declared fit to compete no further push back is needed. Your thought process is pandering to their agenda.
I don't set the Iditarod policy on breed eligibility. Understanding the pressures, including the expectations of the public that sled dogs will look like Northern breeds, and that mushers are already dealing with intense pressure on their sport, is recognizing reality. Not pandering.

Unless dogs have the appearance of Northern breeds they are banned. The competent people in charge made that decision decades ago.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 4:39 pm

Spy Car wrote:
slistoe wrote:I thought we had discounted the Viszla already.

The race is monitored by scores of competent people. If the dogs are examined and declared fit to compete no further push back is needed. Your thought process is pandering to their agenda.
I don't set the Iditarod policy on breed eligibility. Understanding the pressures, including the expectations of the public that sled dogs will look like Northern breeds, and that mushers are already dealing with intense pressure on their sport, is recognizing reality. Not pandering.

Unless dogs have the appearance of Northern breeds they are banned. The competent people in charge made that decision decades ago.

Bill
And it is a good decision but as I remember it was first put in place when Wehle took a team of pointers to a competion years ago and the short stout Husky's couldn't compete so it was decided to limit the dogs that can race. Makes sense since the short coated dogs would be in trouble with the environment they have to compete in on a several day race like that. Even with the dogs bred for it there are a lot that don't finish. The musher we know has never seen or heard of the AR people being concerned but like noted, those dog's health is better monitored and treated than any other competion I am aware of.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by cjhills » Thu Nov 12, 2015 4:46 pm

All of the Pointer or GSP sled dog teams I have seen, including Wehle's, were sprinters and did not run long distance races. The pointers ran all out 'til they hit the wall and needed several days rest between runs. I really doubt they could take Iditarod conditions. they did not know how to throttle down for the long haul. Maybe but I doubt it.
Even my dogs after three days of hard hunting need to lay up for a day or two and they do not come close to the hours the sled dogs put in.
I have a hard time thinking much of a man who lets his pointer sleep outside on the ground at -35. I heat and Ac my kennel, it is the 21 century.................Cj

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by shags » Thu Nov 12, 2015 4:54 pm

Ezzy, have your musher friend google 'PETA sled dog racing'. He needs to wake up. PETA have vets who are against racing.
AR advocates are everywhere, are insidious, and relentless.
At a field trial one weekend we had a couple women of that ilk pull into the parking lot and take note that some of the horses were sweaty. They blathered on for a while and said they were going to report us , etc. Nothing came of it, but you never know when someone will side with the whackadoodles.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by slistoe » Thu Nov 12, 2015 5:20 pm

Well, I couldn't really find a reference to when the wording was added to the race rules, but here is what the Iditarod rules say "Only dogs suitable for arctic travel will be permitted to enter the race.
Suitability will be determined by race officials." I searched the rules for the YuKon Quest and a handful of the other qualifying races for the Iditarod and none of them have any wording in their rules regarding dog description.

So, it really isn't as cut and dry as we are making it out here. Not that there is likely much interest by anyone to try and put together a team of EP's to qualify and challenge the entry - I think they estimate the cost of entering and running in the Iditarod to be somewhere in the $20,000 range and that doesn't cover any of the cost of maintaining a training kennel of some 40 dogs for the requisite number of years to qualify etc.

I am pretty sure that for the imaginable future this will remain solely a thought experiment.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Spy Car » Thu Nov 12, 2015 5:39 pm

All I know is that I'd love to see teams of EPs racing against teams GSPs and Vizslas pulling ultralight charriots in ambient temperatures in the 50s-60s.

Where's your PETA now?

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by ezzy333 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 5:52 pm

shags wrote:Ezzy, have your musher friend google 'PETA sled dog racing'. He needs to wake up. PETA have vets who are against racing.
AR advocates are everywhere, are insidious, and relentless.
At a field trial one weekend we had a couple women of that ilk pull into the parking lot and take note that some of the horses were sweaty. They blathered on for a while and said they were going to report us , etc. Nothing came of it, but you never know when someone will side with the whackadoodles.
We have the same problems at our 4-H and Ag fairs. It is never ending but it also has become something we pay little attention to as it has become common place and has amounted to very little action on their part. It would be my guess they will be around for a while and then we will have to see if they het tired and quit or try to be more active which might not be advantageous to their cause. I think we are all awake but also understand their main purpose is to collect money and to do that they have to publish something horrific to keep people sending in donations. When the money stops they drop the issue rather quickly and move on to some other area but it never stops.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by legallyblonde » Fri Nov 13, 2015 8:24 am

Here in Michigan, which may not be Alaska but still "bleep" cold, the GSP or Pointer and Alaskan Husky mixes dominate mushing. I skijor a bit for fun with my GSP's in the winter and we join in some mushing races and informal runs. I also work with some of the national groups on legislation. Most everyone who is serious runs Eurohounds, which are these Alaskan Husky/GSP/Pointer mixes. Most I see are mixed with GSP, so a lot of the racers here have really eyed my young leggy GSP. I find these dogs fascinating, because there really is no "type". Some have more husky like coats, some look super houndy, and some look like straight GSP's. The following dogs are from a team up north, littermates from a mix that's less than 1/2 GSP.

Image

Image

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Neil » Fri Nov 13, 2015 9:02 am

The AR groups have had their successes, usually with activities that most sportsmen do not support. Dog fighting, cock fighting, horse fighting, horse meat sales, live pigeon shooting, etc. have all been outlawed or driven underground.

I doubt any of us would even attempt to defend animal fighting as a sport, but I do not understand the difference in shooting pen pheasants and trapped pigeons, except the latter are a pest, more like a rat with wings.

So I think there is evidence Ezzy is right, AR groups need money and our acquiescence to succeed.

I support dog sled racing and agree with not allowing short haired dogs compete.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Brazosvalleyvizslas » Fri Nov 13, 2015 11:34 am

Neil wrote:The AR groups have had their successes, usually with activities that most sportsmen do not support. Dog fighting, cock fighting, horse fighting, horse meat sales, live pigeon shooting, etc. have all been outlawed or driven underground.

I doubt any of us would even attempt to defend animal fighting as a sport, but I do not understand the difference in shooting pen pheasants and trapped pigeons, except the latter are a pest, more like a rat with wings.

So I think there is evidence Ezzy is right, AR groups need money and our acquiescence to succeed.

I support dog sled racing and agree with not allowing short haired dogs compete.
Why should they "not be allowed to compete"!!!! Run what you brung and don't worry about what others do.

The pointer breeds are tougher than most people on here think.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Neil » Fri Nov 13, 2015 1:24 pm

Brazosvalleyvizslas wrote:
Neil wrote:The AR groups have had their successes, usually with activities that most sportsmen do not support. Dog fighting, cock fighting, horse fighting, horse meat sales, live pigeon shooting, etc. have all been outlawed or driven underground.

I doubt any of us would even attempt to defend animal fighting as a sport, but I do not understand the difference in shooting pen pheasants and trapped pigeons, except the latter are a pest, more like a rat with wings.

So I think there is evidence Ezzy is right, AR groups need money and our acquiescence to succeed.

I support dog sled racing and agree with not allowing short haired dogs compete.
Why should they "not be allowed to compete"!!!! Run what you brung and don't worry about what others do.

The pointer breeds are tougher than most people on here think.
Simply because I celebrate tradition. The Iditarod is ran in recognition of a historical event, so it seems right to me for the winners to at least resemble those dogs that preformed so heroically. Plus it is their playground and ball. But I certainly agree about the toughness and prowess of the pointing dogs.

Field trials restrict certain breeds; the Alabama Championship, the Continental Championship, the Free For All Championship, and others allow only pointers and setters. What some call the All-Breed, the National Continental or whatever it is, does not allow Brittanys, but Vizslas are allowed.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Brazosvalleyvizslas » Fri Nov 13, 2015 1:53 pm

Neil wrote:
Brazosvalleyvizslas wrote:
Neil wrote:The AR groups have had their successes, usually with activities that most sportsmen do not support. Dog fighting, cock fighting, horse fighting, horse meat sales, live pigeon shooting, etc. have all been outlawed or driven underground.

I doubt any of us would even attempt to defend animal fighting as a sport, but I do not understand the difference in shooting pen pheasants and trapped pigeons, except the latter are a pest, more like a rat with wings.

So I think there is evidence Ezzy is right, AR groups need money and our acquiescence to succeed.

I support dog sled racing and agree with not allowing short haired dogs compete.
Why should they "not be allowed to compete"!!!! Run what you brung and don't worry about what others do.

The pointer breeds are tougher than most people on here think.
Simply because I celebrate tradition. The Iditarod is ran in recognition of a historical event, so it seems right to me for the winners to at least resemble those dogs that preformed so heroically. Plus it is their playground and ball. But I certainly agree about the toughness and prowess of the pointing dogs.

Field trials restrict certain breeds; the Alabama Championship, the Continental Championship, the Free For All Championship, and others allow only pointers and setters. What some call the All-Breed, the National Continental or whatever it is, does not allow Brittanys, but Vizslas are allowed.
I hate to get off topic but why aren't Britt's allowed? Maybe its a Retrieving requirement?

I agree about the "looks" for the dogs that sled though. I sure would love to go see the Iditarod.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Neil » Fri Nov 13, 2015 2:35 pm

I don't know why Britts are not allowed, it is a non-retrieving stake, besides Britts win at about the same percentage in the AKC National Gun Dog Retrieving Championship as entered. And it is not because they are afraid of the competition, there are some really nice dogs there.

Some of the Iditarod is televised each year (mid-February) and you can follow it 24-7 online. The dogs are amazing.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Fun dog » Sun Nov 15, 2015 12:42 pm

Ok guys there is mushing and there is the Iditarod. Not always the same. An Iditarod team must have a double coat and be a northern bred dog, husky! Though not necesarily a Siberian. The dog of choice is the Alaskan Husky. Not a registered breed, but certainly no mut either. There are long pedigrees for these dogs that go back generations. The pedigree goes with the dog if the dog is sold. Years ago Suter ran poodles. Yes they were capable of doing the race as are most of our hunting dogs, but it sure didn't look good to the public when he had to scrape his dogs off the ice with a spatula as his dogs didn't have the coat necessary to insulate them from the elements. Sometimes common sense goes out the window and rules have to be made.

As for other types of mushing. Ski-jor, mid-distance, stage and my forte, sprint or speed , our hunting breeds do quite well, especially the GSP. The shorter the distance, the better they do. The EP is plenty fast, but doesn't handle the cold as well. The Nordic countries and a good portion of Europe rely heavily on these dogs. There are disadvantages though. The short haired dogs are harder to house and they tend to be noisier than the Alaskan Husky. They just require more care. In 4 and 6 dog class the shorthairs excel. The longer the race the more husky you will find bred into the dog. One of the best leaders I've been privelaged to run was my GSP, Chip. How good was he? Well he managed to win the IFSS world championship, beating the best from around the world.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by AlPastor » Sun Nov 15, 2015 5:20 pm

Fun dog wrote:Ok guys there is mushing and there is the Iditarod. Not always the same. An Iditarod team must have a double coat and be a northern bred dog, husky! Though not necesarily a Siberian. The dog of choice is the Alaskan Husky. Not a registered breed, but certainly no mut either. There are long pedigrees for these dogs that go back generations. The pedigree goes with the dog if the dog is sold. Years ago Suter ran poodles. Yes they were capable of doing the race as are most of our hunting dogs, but it sure didn't look good to the public when he had to scrape his dogs off the ice with a spatula as his dogs didn't have the coat necessary to insulate them from the elements. Sometimes common sense goes out the window and rules have to be made.

As for other types of mushing. Ski-jor, mid-distance, stage and my forte, sprint or speed , our hunting breeds do quite well, especially the GSP. The shorter the distance, the better they do. The EP is plenty fast, but doesn't handle the cold as well. The Nordic countries and a good portion of Europe rely heavily on these dogs. There are disadvantages though. The short haired dogs are harder to house and they tend to be noisier than the Alaskan Husky. They just require more care. In 4 and 6 dog class the shorthairs excel. The longer the race the more husky you will find bred into the dog. One of the best leaders I've been privelaged to run was my GSP, Chip. How good was he? Well he managed to win the IFSS world championship, beating the best from around the world.

Could you share what you're feeding the gsps? Supplements? Recovery?

Thanks

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Fun dog » Sun Nov 15, 2015 6:11 pm

I feed my hunting dogs the same as the sleddogs. Just less. Good quality dry dog food all year long. My favorite is Carabou Creek Gold. I used to feed meat, but now just use Annamaet Impact. It's easier to store and smells a whole lot better. . I also use Astaxinthin during the testing and hunting season. Glycocharge is a good post exercise recovery supplement. There is probably no working dog as stressed as a Sleddog. The Iditarod dogs go through 10 -12 thousand calories a day during the Iditarod. The biggest challenge is trying to get that much food down them. They are amazing athletes.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by AlPastor » Sun Nov 15, 2015 6:41 pm

Fun dog wrote:I feed my hunting dogs the same as the sleddogs. Just less. Good quality dry dog food all year long. My favorite is Carabou Creek Gold. I used to feed meat, but now just use Annamaet Impact. It's easier to store and smells a whole lot better. . I also use Astaxinthin during the testing and hunting season. Glycocharge is a good post exercise recovery supplement. There is probably no working dog as stressed as a Sleddog. The Iditarod dogs go through 10 -12 thousand calories a day during the Iditarod. The biggest challenge is trying to get that much food down them. They are amazing athletes.
I want to try caribou creek gold but it is impossible to get around here without buying a pallet. I've been getting great results from inukshuk 30/25 and the price has been great.

I've used impact and it is a quality product.

Whose Astaxinthin are you using? I'm a little leary of the bulk products and have been using human grade at a dose of 48mg daily.

You ever use extra vitamin e?

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by SCT » Sun Nov 15, 2015 6:56 pm

Hmmmm, that CCG sounds like some good sh!t. Wish I could try it here in UT.

Steve

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Spy Car » Sun Nov 15, 2015 9:46 pm

CCG has no red meat (at all), and no chicken "meat" (save what's in chicken-by-product meal). The only organ is chicken liver, so no kidney, thymus, pancreas, spleen, etc, from beef, lamb, bison, elk, or other red meat source.

Fish is good, but this is not a formula with diverse sources of animal proteins.

Way more carbohydrates than a gun dog needs (as they require none).

You'd do beter on a balanced raw diet Steve :wink:

Bill

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by SCT » Sun Nov 15, 2015 10:14 pm

Gotta give you credit for your persistence Bill :D

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Spy Car » Sun Nov 15, 2015 10:35 pm

SCT wrote:Gotta give you credit for your persistence Bill :D
Persistence is my thing Steve...well spotted! :D

You do see that there is no meat in CCG?

Dogs mad for the sardines?

Bill

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by ezzy333 » Mon Nov 16, 2015 8:13 am

My dogs are always mad for oatmeal cookies. Well, I guess they are mad over any cookies as long as it has sugar in it. I am just guessing they like the taste so that is what they eat rather than what we think they should eat. We have found this same thing true with most animals as well as people. I think maybe that is why we all have taste buds.

Persistence is often described as stubborn or failure to learn, not always a desirable quality.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by SCT » Mon Nov 16, 2015 8:16 am

Chicken bi-product meal, and fish meal I think would be considered meat, but I'll give you that it doesn't sound ideal. My dogs love the sardines and I'm trying to feed them one or two every day. Except I went to WY to run them for 3 days and didn't bother to take the fish along.

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Spy Car » Mon Nov 16, 2015 8:27 am

ezzy333 wrote:My dogs are always mad for oatmeal cookies. Well, I guess they are mad over any cookies as long as it has sugar in it. I am just guessing they like the taste so that is what they eat rather than what we think they should eat. We have found this same thing true with most animals as well as people. I think maybe that is why we all have taste buds.

Persistence is often described as stubborn or failure to learn, not always a desirable quality.
It would be great if you showed the capacity to learn something sometime Ezzy. The irony of your posts seems lost on you.

Bill

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by Spy Car » Mon Nov 16, 2015 8:44 am

SCT wrote:Chicken bi-product meal, and fish meal I think would be considered meat, but I'll give you that it doesn't sound ideal. My dogs love the sardines and I'm trying to feed them one or two every day. Except I went to WY to run them for 3 days and didn't bother to take the fish along.
Chicken by-product meal and fish meal are potentially valuable ingredients in a formula, but this one has no chicken, no chicken meal, and no source of red meat (none). The oly organ is liver. Liver is vital, but they only include chicken liver, and there are not other organs.

For I don't se this formula as a holy grail to persuit.

Glad they ared oing well on the fish splementation.

Bill

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by SCT » Mon Nov 16, 2015 10:53 am

Can't say there's any difference in their looks or behavior, but I feel better giving it to them :D

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Re: Iditarod Dog Breeds

Post by shags » Mon Nov 16, 2015 11:08 am

Spy Car wrote:CCG has no red meat (at all), and no chicken "meat" (save what's in chicken-by-product meal). The only organ is chicken liver, so no kidney, thymus, pancreas, spleen, etc, from beef, lamb, bison, elk, or other red meat source.

Fish is good, but this is not a formula with diverse sources of animal proteins.

Way more carbohydrates than a gun dog needs (as they require none).

You'd do beter on a balanced raw diet Steve :wink:

Bill
Holy moly. Here you are still arguing with success, without having given even one example of your program's performance. The proof is in the pudding, and I'd say this poster's pudding turned out very good -
Fun dog wrote:I feed my hunting dogs the same as the sleddogs. Just less. Good quality dry dog food all year long. My favorite is Carabou Creek Gold. I used to feed meat, but now just use Annamaet Impact. It's easier to store and smells a whole lot better. . I also use Astaxinthin during the testing and hunting season. Glycocharge is a good post exercise recovery supplement. There is probably no working dog as stressed as a Sleddog. The Iditarod dogs go through 10 -12 thousand calories a day during the Iditarod. The biggest challenge is trying to get that much food down them. They are amazing athletes.

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