28 ga over a 20 ga

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ibbowhunting
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28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by ibbowhunting » Wed May 02, 2012 4:51 pm

well i was thinking of buying a 28 ga over and under never owned one but thought from want i read i would be a little quieter on the pup and a little more punch then a 410, but was thinking maybe a 20ga would be better because the shells are easyer to find and half as much, can you get lighter 20ga loads, would the noise compare to a 28 ga?is a 20 ga more effective or is the 28 a great all around bird gun mostly for ruffed grouse

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by SetterNut » Wed May 02, 2012 6:04 pm

I have never used a 28ga. They look like nice guns. But for day to day hunting a 20ga is tough to beat. All I use now is a 20ga for upland bird hunting.
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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by birddogger » Wed May 02, 2012 6:42 pm

I think that is an interesting and probably a good combination, but not for the reasons you are saying. :) JMO.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Brittguy » Wed May 02, 2012 7:17 pm

Never had a 28, but I think a 20 would be more useful. I wouldn't be concerned about the difference in noise.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by JIM K » Wed May 02, 2012 7:19 pm

without going into a lot,GET 20GA. :wink:

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Greg Jennings » Thu May 03, 2012 1:21 pm

I LOVE a 28 ga. But, they aren't going to be quieter than a 20. Unless you reload, andI do, the cost of shells would break a Rockefeller.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Stilly Bay » Thu May 03, 2012 2:04 pm

the 28 gauge is not for everyone. if you have a good pointing dog that is a strong retriever and the will power to not shoot at birds that out of range (35 yards is as far as I shoot with a 28) then the little 28 gauge is a lot of fun and very light to carry all day long. but it is a handicap in many situations.

there will be a small noise difference between the 20 and 28. however barrel length will make a bigger difference in perceived noise. wether or not that difference is enough for you I really don't know. I have a 20 gauge O/U with 30"bbls and it seems a heck of a lot softer in the noise dept than my other 20 with 26"bbls.... to everyone else not shooting (and the dog) its just as loud as any other 20.

I will be getting a 28 with 30" bbls just to cut down on noise, with some softer loads it should be a good grouse set up, since I hate grouse hunting with earplugs and can't stand shooting without them.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by gotpointers » Sun May 06, 2012 1:18 am

The 28 has the advantage of having a "square load" meaning it is as deep as it is wide. As mentioned earlier it is great over pointed birds. The 410 is a long thin shot string, if you hit it it will go down. I occasionaly shoot all guages but 16 has been the best compromise for my situation as far as gun weight, distance and pattern. If i had to choose between the 20 and 28 i would go for the 20 just due to 13$ and 5$ a box difference. My sons franchi AL48 20 GA weighs about the same as the CZ ringneck 28 i sold. The 410 i would keep for rabbits maybe.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Ron R » Sun May 06, 2012 9:32 am

I think the 20 gauge is perfect but if a person can only own one gun (for some strange reason :roll: ) the 12 guage is just so versatile.
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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by ranmcc » Mon May 07, 2012 5:26 am

Go with the 20. I just got a new Stoeger sxs for $360 included tax. Good gun for the money but needs to be slicked up some due to metal'finishing. If you can do some minor buffing and cutting you can get a good cheap field gun Just Google licking up a stoeoger for instructions

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by JIM K » Mon May 07, 2012 12:14 pm

something else to think of,if you get the 28 gauge go with longer barrel.say like a FRANCHI AL48 ,i would get the 26 inch barrel in 20ga ,which i did and get the 28 inch in the 28 ga.
28 ga can be wippy with short barrel.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Gordon Guy » Thu May 17, 2012 9:00 am

I have both a 28 and a 20. IMO the fit is more important than the gauge. FYI you can get (low recoil, low velocity) 1100 FPS, 3/4 oz 20 ga shells from RST. http://www.rstshells.com/

I shoot the 1100 FPS 28 gauge shells. I like them and hit well with them ...within reason.

The sound difference is really not noticable... I still have to wear ear plugs
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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by doco » Thu May 17, 2012 10:00 am

I shoot a Browning Citori 20 ga O/U that I bought new in 84'. Stock barrels, no invectichokes, Full over Modified and will part with it at my demise only. I shoot rabbits, quail, chukar, grouse and pheasant without any problems. Over my pointing dogs, I have dropped ringnecks at 45 yards without problem. As for weight or loudness, I notice either when I'm in the field. As for the dogs, they could care less about any of it as long as it is in my hands. For pheasants, I use stock 2 3/4" Remington Game Load 6's followed by a 3" load for the second shot without problems. Although I gave my son my 270 after he shot his first buck, he will not see this gun for a long time, I hope. JMO
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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Leadhead » Tue May 29, 2012 12:21 pm

The only handicap with the 28 or 410 is the shooter not the gun or gage. If you are serious about a 28 then take the time and monies and by a quality shotgun, that is built on the proper frame and not one that is 28 or 410 barrels on a 20 gage frame (receiver). Remember that there is no almost in small gages shotguns, it’s hit or miss.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Mountaineer » Tue May 29, 2012 6:41 pm

Leadhead wrote:The only handicap with the 28 or 410 is the shooter not the gun or gage. If you are serious about a 28 then take the time and monies and by a quality shotgun, that is built on the proper frame and not one that is 28 or 410 barrels on a 20 gage frame (receiver). Remember that there is no almost in small gages shotguns, it’s hit or miss.

The handicap is not only the shooter and the choice of shot taken, it is the shell chosen in the small gauge and the size of bird relative to that gauge.

A 28 on a 20 gauge frame is swell!

With small gauges it is in no way "hit or miss"...wounding happens.....WOW! :roll:

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by JKP » Wed May 30, 2012 7:30 pm

Well this is gonna send some folks off the wall ....but....IMO, the 28 is not the best gun for tough wild birds...yes inside 35 yards, if you know what you are doing, they work (still best if you have a really good dog on cripples)....but it is not the best gun for ALL conditions.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by JIM K » Wed May 30, 2012 7:47 pm

JKP wrote:Well this is gonna send some folks off the wall ....but....IMO, the 28 is not the best gun for tough wild birds...yes inside 35 yards, if you know what you are doing, they work (still best if you have a really good dog on cripples)....but it is not the best gun for ALL conditions.
you are right. most load their shells and tailor them .this helps a lot. longer barrel in 28 gauge helps to.but i like 20 GA the best on small birds like grouse.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by birddogger » Wed May 30, 2012 9:14 pm

JIM K wrote:
JKP wrote:Well this is gonna send some folks off the wall ....but....IMO, the 28 is not the best gun for tough wild birds...yes inside 35 yards, if you know what you are doing, they work (still best if you have a really good dog on cripples)....but it is not the best gun for ALL conditions.
you are right. most load their shells and tailor them .this helps a lot. longer barrel in 28 gauge helps to.but i like 20 GA the best on small birds like grouse.
What difference does a longer barrel in a 28 ga. make?

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by JIM K » Wed May 30, 2012 9:32 pm

birddogger wrote:
JIM K wrote:
JKP wrote:Well this is gonna send some folks off the wall ....but....IMO, the 28 is not the best gun for tough wild birds...yes inside 35 yards, if you know what you are doing, they work (still best if you have a really good dog on cripples)....but it is not the best gun for ALL conditions.
you are right. most load their shells and tailor them .this helps a lot. longer barrel in 28 gauge helps to.but i like 20 GA the best on small birds like grouse.
What difference does a longer barrel in a 28 ga. make?

Charlie

with LIGHT 28 ga it does help on swing.some say and some dont say that 2 more inchs does help on pattern vrs a 26 inch barrel on lighter gauges, only what i read from many experts.i know my 12 ga beretta uricka field does handle better with 28 inch barrel vrs 26 .

on my franchi al48 with close shots on grouse and no need for SWING , i like 26 inch barrel.

if you look at franchi al48 in 28 ga they seem to offer the 28 inch barrel most and even price is higher for 28 inch barrel in 28 ga.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by JKP » Thu May 31, 2012 10:43 am

I find 28s and some 20s are too whippy for me...I start to spot shoot rather than swing...but I'm 6'3" and 220. Can be done....different strokes. I stay with 16's and 12's. 6 to 6 1/2 lbs doesn't bother me. Don't shoot enough shells to worry about the cost. Even if I do a few rounds of clays, a few cases of 12's on sale is cheap. I like my old, cheap, unwanted 16 gauge guns....people were throwing them out years back....and the extra cost on actual shells shot when hunting can't be $25/yr.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Mountaineer » Thu May 31, 2012 10:49 am

A longer barrel on any gauge can help as it can improve balance which can make a shooter enjoy the gun more, so gain confidence and therefore shoot...better.
All dependent upon the particllar scattergun and the particular shooter.

There is absolutely no difference in pattern versus barrel length.

A 28 maxes out at a heavy 30 yards on birds the size of ruffed grouse.
Larger birds can be taken as birds die pretty easily but why push the envelope?
One will have more birds returned with their heads up than down, with a 28.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by JIM K » Thu May 31, 2012 11:16 am

some like to get me to say, LONGER BARREL PATTERNS BETTER,HEHE. 8)
but i am from the old school and if it does or not i FEEL it does give you a longer shot . :roll:

but to make it real simple. for hunting GROUSE in pa for 46 yrs,i like TO POINT a shotgun and 26 inch barrel in semi is perfect in 20 ga.
in field hunting pheasants where you can swing my semi, i only like a 28 inch barrel and only a 12 ga.

so, i have BERETTA URICKA FIELD 12 GA IN 28 INCH.
FRANCHI AL48 20GA in the 26 inch barrel for deep woods.
but if i had the 28 ga, i would get 28 inch barrel in it for woods as it is wimpy with light weight.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by birddogger » Thu May 31, 2012 8:31 pm

OK, thanks for the response. I can understand the longer barrel maybe handling better on a smaller gun but it won't make any difference in pattern or range, which is what I thought you may have meant.

Thanks,
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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by JIM K » Fri Jun 01, 2012 5:36 pm

birddogger wrote:OK, thanks for the response. I can understand the longer barrel maybe handling better on a smaller gun but it won't make any difference in pattern or range, which is what I thought you may have meant.

Thanks,
Charlie
if in your mind you feel a LONGER barrel swings better and feels better, you will be better shot.
but that type of hunting is only good where you CAN swing shotgun.in thick brush a quick grouse, no swing or balance is necessary in my opinion.
its all about ,REFLEX POINTING. 8)

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by birddogger » Fri Jun 01, 2012 6:02 pm

JIM K wrote:
birddogger wrote:OK, thanks for the response. I can understand the longer barrel maybe handling better on a smaller gun but it won't make any difference in pattern or range, which is what I thought you may have meant.

Thanks,
Charlie
if in your mind you feel a LONGER barrel swings better and feels better, you will be better shot.
but that type of hunting is only good where you CAN swing shotgun.in thick brush a quick grouse, no swing or balance is necessary in my opinion.
its all about ,REFLEX POINTING. 8)
No argument there. I prefer a shorter barrel because most of my hunting is for bob whites.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Tejas » Tue Jun 19, 2012 9:23 pm

It depends....the 28 ga. shot string is superior to the 20 ga. I've shot straights at skeet and limited out on dove with a 28. I've never found range to be a problem, but I'm judicious as to the range I shoot at regardless of the game.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Doodle » Wed Jun 20, 2012 4:40 am

20 ga. readily available and pretty versatile. I would invest in some 2 1/2" light RST shot shell loads for getting a young dog started. You can likely find something equivilent to a 28 ga. shell if that's what you are looking for. No need to add the weight of tube inserts to a 20 ga gun. Although adding another firearm to the collection is never really a bad idea.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by DonF » Mon Jul 02, 2012 9:41 am

I have a 410, 28 and two 16's. The 28 is really light for carrying and only disadvantage is range. The 16's are different and I think that is my biggest attraction there. A 20 will do about everything a 16 will and a 12 will do more.

Handloading you can get pretty much the same velocit's out of each gage. You can also load the same size shot in each. What you can't do it get the same amount of shot in each. More shot equals a denser shot pattern which get's longer range.

I love my 28 and I load for it. I could not afford to shoot the field loads in it. I bought a flat of target loads in 28 when I started just for the hulls. All 3/4 oz of #8. They make good quail loads but they cost me $11 a box. Field loads ran just under $20 a box.

If I was to have only one shotgun it would be a 12ga. Load 1 1/8 oz target loads with #6 shot and your good to go. Very easy recoil enough velocity and shot weight to down anything in the upland.
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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by RobGSP » Wed Jul 04, 2012 8:21 pm

I use a 20 gauge and load a 3/4 ounce load. Clay buster has a 3/4 ounce wad that makes reloading a breeze. My 20 ga guns weigh under 6 pounds each so they are great to carry. Not sure if this info will help you but I thought I would pass it along.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by RayGubernat » Thu Jul 05, 2012 8:11 am

I have been birdhunting with a 20 ga. over pointing dogs for quite a few years now. I started out with a 12 ga, but switched over to the 20 when I was just a young man and never looked back. With the 12, I found I was really pounding the birds.

My son's first gun was a .410 and it is a significant handicap. It really is an "experts" gun. He eneded up shooting it reasonably well, but that is more a measure of his determination to succeed than anything else. According to Brister, the shot string on a .410 is the longest of all the gauges...and it contains the fewest shot to begin with. With the .410 the axiom "try to miss out front" really makes sense.

I recently bought a 28 ga. O/U for my first grandson. My son and I both shot it, you know, just to make sure it was OK. It points well, swings nicely and if you are on target, it absolutely powders the clay. Incidentally, I was able to buy Winchester AA and Remington high brass shells at my Wal Mart for not much more than for 20's. They only had 7 1/2's and 8's in stock but then they don't have many 6's in 12 or 20 ga. here either.

Based on my limited experience with the 28 ga. I would say it would be just fine for stocked birds over points and probably just fine for most wild birds except perhaps pheasant over points.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Ms. Cage » Thu Jul 05, 2012 9:59 am

28 ga. is my husbands go to shotgun. Howie has shot many, many grouse and woodcock over 30 yrs. of shooting a 28. Pheasant , he does shoot his 28 on days with light wind but must pull the trigger with in 30 yds.. Likes to tighten the chokes to full and mod for pheasants even at closer range. We use 20 ga. for training due to price. A box of 20 ga. run us $6.00 a box vs. $12.00 a box for 28ga. Both 20 and 28 estate brand. Wal Mart doesn't carry 28 ga. up here.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by JIM K » Thu Jul 05, 2012 11:32 am

RayGubernat wrote:I have been birdhunting with a 20 ga. over pointing dogs for quite a few years now. I started out with a 12 ga, but switched over to the 20 when I was just a young man and never looked back. With the 12, I found I was really pounding the birds.

My son's first gun was a .410 and it is a significant handicap. It really is an "experts" gun. He eneded up shooting it reasonably well, but that is more a measure of his determination to succeed than anything else. According to Brister, the shot string on a .410 is the longest of all the gauges...and it contains the fewest shot to begin with. With the .410 the axiom "try to miss out front" really makes sense.

I recently bought a 28 ga. O/U for my first grandson. My son and I both shot it, you know, just to make sure it was OK. It points well, swings nicely and if you are on target, it absolutely powders the clay. Incidentally, I was able to buy Winchester AA and Remington high brass shells at my Wal Mart for not much more than for 20's. They only had 7 1/2's and 8's in stock but then they don't have many 6's in 12 or 20 ga. here either.

Based on my limited experience with the 28 ga. I would say it would be just fine for stocked birds over points and probably just fine for most wild birds except perhaps pheasant over points.

RayG


federal has shotgun shell out now for 20ga that is steel etc in no.3 size in 3 inch shell. i understand it knocks pheasants out to 40 yds right down.

i still use 12 ga for pheasants and franchi 20 ga for smaller birds.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by prairiefirepointers » Tue Jul 10, 2012 6:11 am

ibbowhunting wrote:well i was thinking of buying a 28 ga over and under never owned one but thought from want i read i would be a little quieter on the pup and a little more punch then a 410, but was thinking maybe a 20ga would be better because the shells are easyer to find and half as much, can you get lighter 20ga loads, would the noise compare to a 28 ga?is a 20 ga more effective or is the 28 a great all around bird gun mostly for ruffed grouse
Heres my advice. Don't purchase a 28 gauge without buying a reloader or already having the means to reload them yourself. The retail of 28 gauge shells are out of sight. If you can reload them then they are cheap and extremely versatile. I shoot skeet, dove, quail, you name it with my 28. I even bagged my first Rooster pheasant of the 2011 season with my Legacy 28.

The 28 is surely a sweet little gun to shoot though. :D
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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by tdhusker » Wed Jul 18, 2012 4:59 pm

I hunt with several guys who use 28s, I've used a few. What I don't like about 28's:
1. Unless you go to a premium gun, usually over $2500, you will have a gun that weighs more than a 20. That is because most 28's are built on a 20 ga or 12 ga frame.
2. Shells are very high priced.
3. Premium 20 ga ammo costs less and kills better. There really is no debating that, in my experience. I've hunted with Benelli 28's and switched off to my Benelli 20, same gun, just kills phez better. If you aren't hunting phez, then this may not be an issue.

The nicest 28 I've hunted with was a Beretta SPIII that has the baby frame. They run about $2500+. It was a sweetheart and I would own one if I didn't mind taking a $2500 gun hunting... If I'm going to spend $2500 on something to go bird hunting though, it's probably going to burn dog food. I use a SPII 20 ga that I bought used for $1250 a few years back. I really like it. I use a 20ga Benelli once in a while, mainly for sharptail and doves.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by prairiefirepointers » Thu Sep 13, 2012 10:19 pm

tdhusker wrote:I hunt with several guys who use 28s, I've used a few. What I don't like about 28's:
1. Unless you go to a premium gun, usually over $2500, you will have a gun that weighs more than a 20. That is because most 28's are built on a 20 ga or 12 ga frame.
Not always... The Legacy 28 is the worlds lightest autoloading shotgun in current production. I got mine brand spankin new and a case of shells for just over $2000.00

Having shot one yourself you know that they are the exception... not on a big gun frame. Perfectly scaled down to size. The only notable difference I notice on the skeet field between my Performance Shop SS 12ga, and my Legacy 28 is weight... The 28 obviously swings more aggressively due to weighing only 4.9 lbs.
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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by tdhusker » Wed Sep 19, 2012 4:19 pm

prairiefirepointers wrote:
tdhusker wrote:I hunt with several guys who use 28s, I've used a few. What I don't like about 28's:
1. Unless you go to a premium gun, usually over $2500, you will have a gun that weighs more than a 20. That is because most 28's are built on a 20 ga or 12 ga frame.
Not always... The Legacy 28 is the worlds lightest autoloading shotgun in current production. I got mine brand spankin new and a case of shells for just over $2000.00

Having shot one yourself you know that they are the exception... not on a big gun frame. Perfectly scaled down to size. The only notable difference I notice on the skeet field between my Performance Shop SS 12ga, and my Legacy 28 is weight... The 28 obviously swings more aggressively due to weighing only 4.9 lbs.

I've hunted with the Benelli 28 ga Ultralight and the 28 ga Legacy. Hard to tell any difference between the two. As far as that goes, the difference in weight between a 20ga Monte and 28 ga Legacy is mostly insignificant. You can buy used 20 ga Monte's for $600. If I'm shopping for a field semiauto gun, I'd buy the used Monte, change the recoil spring and go hunting. The extra grand+ you'll spend on the Legacy or Ultralight isn't buying you any performance and certainly no better shooting/handling gun.

A used 20ga Monte is probably the best upland auto gun going for price and performance. Once you change the spring (they all need it after a few years) you have a gun that will run like a new one. They have a very nice thin forearm and are very light with grown-up stock dimensions, are pleasant to shoot with 2 3/4" field loads too. Stay away from shooting 3" mags in any Montefeltro 12 or 20, they'll knock you silly.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by JIM K » Fri Sep 21, 2012 7:57 am

tdhusker wrote:
prairiefirepointers wrote:
tdhusker wrote:I hunt with several guys who use 28s, I've used a few. What I don't like about 28's:
1. Unless you go to a premium gun, usually over $2500, you will have a gun that weighs more than a 20. That is because most 28's are built on a 20 ga or 12 ga frame.
Not always... The Legacy 28 is the worlds lightest autoloading shotgun in current production. I got mine brand spankin new and a case of shells for just over $2000.00

Having shot one yourself you know that they are the exception... not on a big gun frame. Perfectly scaled down to size. The only notable difference I notice on the skeet field between my Performance Shop SS 12ga, and my Legacy 28 is weight... The 28 obviously swings more aggressively due to weighing only 4.9 lbs.

I've hunted with the Benelli 28 ga Ultralight and the 28 ga Legacy. Hard to tell any difference between the two. As far as that goes, the difference in weight between a 20ga Monte and 28 ga Legacy is mostly insignificant. You can buy used 20 ga Monte's for $600. If I'm shopping for a field semiauto gun, I'd buy the used Monte, change the recoil spring and go hunting. The extra grand+ you'll spend on the Legacy or Ultralight isn't buying you any performance and certainly no better shooting/handling gun.

A used 20ga Monte is probably the best upland auto gun going for price and performance. Once you change the spring (they all need it after a few years) you have a gun that will run like a new one. They have a very nice thin forearm and are very light with grown-up stock dimensions, are pleasant to shoot with 2 3/4" field loads too. Stay away from shooting 3" mags in any Montefeltro 12 or 20, they'll knock you silly.
i saw one for 700 used but it had 24 inch barrel, i think.it was in excellent shape.
i paid that much for my FRANCHI AL48 ,20GA NEW.

but to me, the beretta SYSTEM IS BEST ,i like gas better than inertia thing hands down.recoil is unreal tame on BERETTAS.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by tdhusker » Fri Sep 21, 2012 9:43 am

I hunt the windy plains of South Dakota and Nebraska. Lots of blowing dirt and dust, especially when hunting in grain fields. Gas guns work fine but you have to clean them regularly. Even one day of really tough conditions and the trusty Beretta will need a cleaning to keep it running good. Benellis require some care in those conditions, but not nearly as much. I like the way gas guns shoot but if you're using field loads, a Benelli is plenty tame. If I hunted where wind and dirt weren't a problem, I'd probably be a Beretta (or Franchi or whatever) guy too.

I probably spend 30 days a year hunting upland. I hunt with a fairly large number of different folks and help quite a few of them with their guns. A Benelli with good springs is about as good as it gets for dependability and low maintenance when talking autos.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Mountaineer » Fri Sep 21, 2012 2:45 pm

I had a couple of 391s...they run best wet and that will attract dirt.
That said, I never saw an issue not shell or shooter related in dusty conditions in Kansas and Iowa.
Not saying it would not happen but a cleaning lick and a promise solves most issues.
I did have a cycling issue with a Beretta Pintail...an inertia gun....it got traded off but was a solid scattergun when it worked.

Pick any scattergun by how the stock bulk fits you, the trigger and whether it's balance fits your shooting style....recoil absorbation or manner of action is small taters, comparably.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by gotpointers » Fri Sep 21, 2012 8:24 pm

My super black eagle is a little finicky. But I have no problems ewith my 390, al48 or montefeltro. The sbe sees lots of water and mud though.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by roaniecowpony » Mon Apr 01, 2013 3:51 pm

This old thread seems like a summer rerun of the doublegunshop threads. This gauge vs that. Bottom line, all the gauges throw the shot at about the same speed. If you hit a bird with the pattern centered at a distance the particular load/gun has sufficient pattern density, you'll kill the bird as dead as the next gauge. A grouse is a mid sized bird that is roughly the same size as a chukar from what I gather (I don't grouse hunt). Chukar drop like a brick when hit with my .410 loads of 11/16 oz or 3/4 oz of #6 shot at reasonable ranges depending on the choke. I've killed chukar at over 40 yrds with both .410 and 28ga with guns that shoot tight.

If you aren't confident with a gun for whatever reason, be it because of the gauge being a bit small for you or any other thing, you'll probably not shoot it well. Buy and shoot the gun you feel good about. If that's a 10 ga or a .410, it doesn't matter to anyone except yourself.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Spotswood » Fri May 17, 2013 6:23 am

Bottom line is the shotgun needs to fit you.
The gun should really be at least 6 pounds. Anything less than that is too light and not controllable.
My 28 gauge game guns all have 30 inch barrels with fixed full chokes and weight 7 pounds. They are on scaled down 28 guage receivers.
You can build a 28 guage gun on a scaled down 20 guage receiver with Perazzi and then you can keep the weight up. It makes for a better target gun.
IF you get the barrels too short the gun will be too whippy and if too light it will not swing smooth enough and you may stop your swing.

I think having a 28 guage and a 12 guage covers everything, although I hunt with an old Winchester model 42 pump 4.10 for quail. That has a 28 inch barrel with a fixed full choke.
These three guns cover everything.


Good luck
Gary

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by roaniecowpony » Fri May 24, 2013 5:58 pm

Gary
Another 42 fan here.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Allan » Wed Jan 01, 2014 5:57 pm

I like shooting both. The 28's a little less kick. I have a citori 625 with 28 inch tubes and a Merkel sxs with 28 inch tubes in 28 gauge. I also shoot a Browning 20 gauge sidelock sxs. All three are fun and the lite weight helps out also. If you have hunted with a 12 gauge, then shoot the other just the same.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by DonF » Fri Jan 10, 2014 9:26 am

Last year I started using my 28, my go to gun now. Only use any gun shooting over my dog's so range doesn't concern me a lot. Skeet/imp Cyl in it. Handles like a dream. Couple months ago I tried my 410 out training. Boy is it nice to carry around and shoot. 28 has next to no recoil and the 410 is less. Only been using 1/2 oz loads and doing fine. I've also got a couple 16's and they don't get used much anymore! Considering the birds I like to hunt, if I only had one gun it would be my 28. One catch with the 28 and the 410, you don't reload them, they are expensive as all get out! I reload my 28 and this summer getting the 410 press!
I pity the man that has never been loved by a dog!

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by jack the dog » Fri Jan 10, 2014 1:33 pm

Go with the 20ga for this reason.

Imagine yourself on the hunt of a lifetime way to heck in BFE. The shooting is so good there that after four days you run out of ammo. A country store (the only one in 50+ miles) has a few boxes of shells. Which will the store likely not have on their shelves? Your choices are;
a)12 ga
b)16ga
c)20ga
d)28ga
e)410 bore

They will have, a and c for sure, probably have e, might have b, but I bet you they won't have d. At that point your hunt is ruined.

Get a 20ga, your hunting will be just as good as with the 28, and you will always find ammo.
Let me always be the person my dog thinks I am.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Uplandish » Fri Jan 10, 2014 8:59 pm

jack the dog wrote:Go with the 20ga for this reason.

Imagine yourself on the hunt of a lifetime way to heck in BFE. The shooting is so good there that after four days you run out of ammo. A country store (the only one in 50+ miles) has a few boxes of shells. Which will the store likely not have on their shelves? Your choices are;
a)12 ga
b)16ga
c)20ga
d)28ga
e)410 bore

They will have, a and c for sure, probably have e, might have b, but I bet you they won't have d. At that point your hunt is ruined.

Get a 20ga, your hunting will be just as good as with the 28, and you will always find ammo.
If you run out of shells during the hunt of a lifetime out in BFE you deserve what you get. 8)

Gene Hill had no use for the 20 gauge, preferring the 28 and 16 instead, and he knew a thing or two about smooth bores.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by roaniecowpony » Mon Jan 27, 2014 3:47 am

A man should always have multiple guns on road trips. Guns are machines and machines fail at the most inopportune times. Having plenty of ammo of your choosing before you start the journey or a known source along the way is mandatory regardless of what gauge you shoot. The argument about lack of availability of this gauge or that has little or no impact in the real world to me since I always bring multiple guns/gauges and plenty of ammunition for each.

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by DonF » Mon Jan 27, 2014 10:58 am

Boy is this old. I weaned myself off a 12ga long ago. In this past year I've pretty much weaned myself off my 16ga, love it but. Don't know why but I started using my 28 for dog training and boy was that nice. Then decided to give my 410 a try training. Now I go somewhere to shoot birds I take along the 28 to shoot and the 410 as my spare. I've had several 20's but they never really grabbed me. Prefered a 12 over the 20. Don't ask why, just do. I think the thing to keep in mind other than available ammo Is that the sub gages will fire the same size of shot just as fast. Difference is the amount of shot in the load. A piece of #6 shot out of a 410 and a 12 ga travels pretty much just as fast and does the same damage. The difference in the two is that the 12ga carry's a bigger load but the 410 is a lot lighter. In my 28 I shoot 3/4oz loads of 6's or 7 1/2's. In the 410 I use 2 1/2" with 1/2oz of #6's. I think 7 1/2's might be better but I've had no trouble dropping birds for the dogs over point's with the 1/2oz loads. Big thing about the 28 and 410, unless you have a really good job, get into reloading them. 28 field loads here last I checked were about $18 a box, target loads were about $12 a box. That is assuming you can find them. Reloads run me under $4 a box. 410's will be even cheaper so there will be a 410 loader here this year.

One problem for a lot of people with their 20's is to make up for what they think is a lesser load by going to 3" loads. Well they will get you closer to the 16 and the 12 but you'll have a much lighter gun and I strongly suspect recoil is gonna go up enough that your better off using a 12 or 16 with light loads.
I pity the man that has never been loved by a dog!

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Re: 28 ga over a 20 ga

Post by Uplandish » Tue Jan 28, 2014 12:40 am

DonF wrote: I think the thing to keep in mind other than available ammo Is that the sub gages will fire the same size of shot just as fast. Difference is the amount of shot in the load. A piece of #6 shot out of a 410 and a 12 ga travels pretty much just as fast and does the same damage. The difference in the two is that the 12ga carry's a bigger load but the 410 is a lot lighter. In my 28 I shoot 3/4oz loads of 6's or 7 1/2's. In the 410 I use 2 1/2" with 1/2oz of #6's. I think 7 1/2's might be better but I've had no trouble dropping birds for the dogs over point's with the 1/2oz loads.
to a certain extent. While a 28 gauge patterns as good as 12 or 16 gauge its effective range is a bit shorter. Shorter still for the 410

IMO the only real reason to try different gauges ( besides for fun) is to find the gun that handles best for you. You can shoot half oz loads out of a 12 gauge and essentially have a heavy nearly recoilless 28gauge, or you can shoot 1oz loads out a 28 gauge and have essentially a light 16 or 20 gauge. there is nothing magical about different gauges unless you spend a lot of time at the patterning board and a lot of time shooting targets,otherwise its just pellets flying out of a tube. the only real outsider in the equation is the 410, whose patterning ability and payload is drastically different from the other larger gauges.
All of that gets thrown out the window when you are talking steel shot, then your stuck with 12,16, or 3" 20 gauge for anything past 30 yards.

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