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Dog fainting (?) in heat

Dog fainting (?) in heat

Postby Wayfaring Stranger » Sun Apr 13, 2008 11:56 am

Hi all. Fist post here. I got a 4 yo GSP in good shape. I just moved to TX from Idaho so we're getting adjusted to the new climate. Due to a lack of a really good place to run him here in the 'burbs, I've been running with him on leash along paved paths. He handles the run fine in temps up to the mid 80's as long as we stop once or twice for water.

On a few occasions, when we stop to cross a street or talk to neighbors, he'll kind of faint. he doesn't go unconsious, he just seems to loose strenght to stand. I usaully help him up and he just seems to shake it off and go on with the walk. Any ideas? Does it sound dangerous?
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Postby MikeB » Sun Apr 13, 2008 5:27 pm

I would see the Vet for a complete exam. Could be most anything.
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Postby Wayfaring Stranger » Sun Apr 13, 2008 7:15 pm

MikeB wrote:I would see the Vet for a complete exam. Could be most anything.


well... It actually happened once at the vet's office. my wife walked him there in ~75 degre weather. He even peed himself that time. they had no comment.
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Postby ezzy333 » Sun Apr 13, 2008 8:16 pm

Almost sounds like heat stroke. I too would get it checked out.

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Postby Wayfaring Stranger » Mon Apr 14, 2008 4:07 pm

TTT for any other ideas.
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Postby BigShooter » Mon Apr 14, 2008 4:19 pm

When it happened at the vet's office did a vet do an immediate exam? Although it could be lots of things I'd start with the circulation system. There are heart irregularities that will cause the condition you described.
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Postby Streenie79 » Tue Apr 15, 2008 8:27 am

I'm curious to know what you've found out about this "fainting" business... What were/are your vet's thoughts......?
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Postby BigShooter » Tue Apr 15, 2008 9:01 am

To find out if the dog is overheated you could certainly carry a thermometer and a little lubricant & check the dog's rectal temperature yourself during one of these episodes.

P.S. I don't know all of the acronyms, what's "TTT"
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Postby WildRose » Tue Apr 15, 2008 11:17 am

Unless there's something terribly wrong with your dog like being about 20lbs over weight there's no way a healthy dog is going to overheat while he's running along with you on a leash, even if you run marathons as long as he gets well hydrated along the way.

My suspicion would be he's suffering from exercise induced hypoglycemic shock, or perhaps some sort of siezure disorder.

It makes no sense whatsoever that if your dog had one of these episodes at the vet that they did nothing to investigate the cause.

Carry a thermometer along on your runs, if the dog's temp gets over 105 make a note of it. If it occurs again take the temp again, note it.

Also carry some kayro syrup or some small packs of honey. next time this occurs get one in the dog as quickly as possible and see if it expedites the recovery.

Then discuss your findings with your vet. CR
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Faitning

Postby MikeB » Tue Apr 15, 2008 11:55 am

TTT for any other ideas.... What does that mean?

Has any Vet so far done any real exam or lab tests? Besides a heart problem could be blood sugar levels. I'd get a new vet that cares when his/her patients faint in the office.
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Postby wems2371 » Tue Apr 15, 2008 8:09 pm

Wayfaring Stranger wrote:TTT for any other ideas.


I'm not good with abbreviations guys, but my husband knew this one. He says that TTT stands for "to the top". Meaning that the original poster of this thread posted again, so the his thread would go "to the top" of the Health & Nutrition Forum................in hopes of others seeing it and responding.................and the thread not getting buried and ignored.

Hope that's right Wayfaring Stranger, and TTT. LOL Denise
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Postby BigShooter » Wed Apr 16, 2008 10:18 am

Thanks Denise ... I never would have figured out the abbreviation.

WS,

I have personal experience with two epileptic Britts. I had thought that most seizure disorders were genetically linked and would show up at an earlier age.

As you did not provide any further info we have to assume the dog didn't sustain any type of injury of which you are aware, like for example an injury to the thyroid. The thyroid lies along the trachea and reportedly can be damaged by the old style choke chains. Does the dog have any skin abnormalities, like a dull or dry coat or hair loss?

The best source for good diagnosis is your vet. Possibilities proposed over the net by non-vets is a stab in the dark compared to a vet's exam accompanied by any necessary diagnostic blood work, EKGs, x-rays or ultrasound.

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Postby Wayfaring Stranger » Wed Apr 16, 2008 7:21 pm

BigShooter wrote:were genetically linked and would show up at an earlier age.

As you did not provide any further info we have to assume the dog didn't sustain any type of injury of which you are aware, like for example an injury to the thyroid. The thyroid lies along the trachea and reportedly can be damaged by the old style choke chains. Does the dog have any skin abnormalities, like a dull or dry coat or hair loss?


Mark


My heart sank when I read this. We never walked him on a leash much until recently because we moved into the 'burbs. My GSP is very hard headed and I resorted to a choke chain to keep him from pulling me and tripping me. His episoed have never happend befor use of the choke chain. I'm hanging it up for now to see if it makes a difference.

He's in fantastic shape and has no health problems other than this issue. Thank you.
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Postby Wayfaring Stranger » Wed Apr 16, 2008 7:25 pm

wems2371 wrote:
Wayfaring Stranger wrote:
Hope that's right Wayfaring Stranger, and TTT. LOL Denise
:wink:
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Postby BigShooter » Thu Apr 17, 2008 10:40 am

If the problem continues and you suspect possible permanent damage to the thyroid, bring the dog to a vet for diagnosis & blood work. If necessary, hormone replacement therapy is available.

Hoping for the best,

Mark
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