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Kosher Woodcock?

Kosher Woodcock?

Postby JHumes » Mon Jan 17, 2011 4:49 pm

Is woodcock meat considered kosher?
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby ezzy333 » Mon Jan 17, 2011 5:03 pm

It's my understanding that kosher depends on how it is slaughtered,how it is processed and whether it has been blessed by the Rabbi.

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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby topher40 » Mon Jan 17, 2011 5:15 pm

I honestly think I have heard it all now. No offense to anyones religious beliefs, but this is a first. If you have questions, and your Jewish then feed it to your dog............Unless your dogs are also Jewish. lol From what I understand EZZY is correct, although if your concerned why wouldn't you turn to your Rabbi or already know?
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby JHumes » Mon Jan 17, 2011 6:47 pm

I'm a Christain,and I am not concerned about the killing procedure,but I would like to know if the meat itself is considered Kosher.It mainly just the clean/non-clean meat thing.
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby kninebirddog » Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:28 am

Hopefully this will help answer your question.
http://www.jewfaq.org/kashrut.htm


General Rules

Although the details of kashrut are extensive, the laws all derive from a few fairly simple, straightforward rules:

1. Certain animals may not be eaten at all. This restriction includes the flesh, organs, eggs and milk of the forbidden animals.
2. Of the animals that may be eaten, the birds and mammals must be killed in accordance with Jewish law.
3. All blood must be drained from meat and poultry or broiled out of it before it is eaten.
4. Certain parts of permitted animals may not be eaten.
5. Fruits and vegetables are permitted, but must be inspected for bugs (which cannot be eaten)
6. Meat (the flesh of birds and mammals) cannot be eaten with dairy. Fish, eggs, fruits, vegetables and grains can be eaten with either meat or dairy. (According to some views, fish may not be eaten with meat).
7. Utensils (including pots and pans and other cooking surfaces) that have come into contact with meat may not be used with dairy, and vice versa. Utensils that have come into contact with non-kosher food may not be used with kosher food. This applies only where the contact occurred while the food was hot.
8. Grape products made by non-Jews may not be eaten.
9. There are a few other rules that are not universal.

The Details
Animals that may not be eaten

Of the "beasts of the earth" (which basically refers to land mammals with the exception of swarming rodents), you may eat any animal that has cloven hooves and chews its cud. Lev. 11:3; Deut. 14:6. Any land mammal that does not have both of these qualities is forbidden. The Torah specifies that the camel, the rock badger, the hare and the pig are not kosher because each lacks one of these two qualifications. Cattle, sheep, goats, deer and bison are kosher.

Of the things that are in the waters, you may eat anything that has fins and scales. Lev. 11:9; Deut. 14:9. Thus, shellfish such as lobsters, oysters, shrimp, clams and crabs are all forbidden. Fish like tuna, carp, salmon and herring are all permitted.

For birds, the criteria is less clear. The Torah provides a list of forbidden birds (Lev. 11:13-19; Deut. 14:11-18), but does not specify why these particular birds are forbidden. All of the birds on the list are birds of prey or scavengers, thus the rabbis inferred that this was the basis for the distinction. Other birds are permitted, such as chicken, geese, ducks and turkeys. However, some people avoid turkey, because it is was unknown at the time of the giving of the Torah, leaving room for doubt.

Of the "winged swarming things" (winged insects), a few are specifically permitted (Lev. 11:22), but the Sages are no longer certain which ones they are, so all have been forbidden. There are communities that have a tradition about what species are permitted, and in those communities some insects are eaten.

Rodents, reptiles, amphibians, and insects (except as mentioned above) are all forbidden. Lev. 11:29-30, 42-43.

Some authorities require a post-mortem examination of the lungs of cattle, to determine whether the lungs are free from adhesions. If the lungs are free from such adhesions, the animal is deemed "glatt" (that is, "smooth"). In certain circumstances, an animal can be kosher without being glatt; however, the stringency of keeping "glatt kosher" has become increasingly common in recent years, and you would be hard-pressed to find any kosher meat that is not labeled as "glatt kosher."

As mentioned above, any product derived from these forbidden animals, such as their milk, eggs, fat, or organs, also cannot be eaten. Rennet, an enzyme used to harden cheese, is often obtained from non-kosher animals, thus kosher hard cheese can be difficult to find.
Kosher slaughtering

The mammals and birds that may be eaten must be slaughtered in accordance with Jewish law. (Deut. 12:21). We may not eat animals that died of natural causes (Deut. 14:21) or that were killed by other animals. In addition, the animal must have no disease or flaws in the organs at the time of slaughter. These restrictions do not apply to fish; only to the flocks and herds (Num. 11:22).

Ritual slaughter is known as shechitah, and the person who performs the slaughter is called a shochet, both from the Hebrew root Shin-Cheit-Teit. The method of slaughter is a quick, deep stroke across the throat with a perfectly sharp blade with no nicks or unevenness. This method is painless, causes unconsciousness within two seconds, and is widely recognized as the most humane method of slaughter possible.

Another advantage of shechitah is that it ensures rapid, complete draining of the blood, which is also necessary to render the meat kosher.

The shochet is not simply a butcher; he must be a pious man, well-trained in Jewish law, particularly as it relates to kashrut. In smaller, more remote communities, the rabbi and the shochet were often the same person.
Draining of Blood

The Torah prohibits consumption of blood. Lev. 7:26-27; Lev. 17:10-14. This is the only dietary law that has a reason specified in Torah: we do not eat blood because the life of the animal (literally, the soul of the animal) is contained in the blood. This applies only to the blood of birds and mammals, not to fish blood. Thus, it is necessary to remove all blood from the flesh of kosher animals.

The first step in this process occurs at the time of slaughter. As discussed above, shechitah allows for rapid draining of most of the blood.

The remaining blood must be removed, either by broiling or soaking and salting. Liver may only be kashered by the broiling method, because it has so much blood in it and such complex blood vessels. This final process must be completed within 72 hours after slaughter, and before the meat is frozen or ground. Most butchers and all frozen food vendors take care of the soaking and salting for you, but you should always check this when you are buying someplace you are unfamiliar with.

An egg that contains a blood spot may not be eaten. This isn't very common, but I find them once in a while. It is a good idea to break an egg into a glass and check it before you put it into a heated pan, because if you put a blood-stained egg into a heated pan, the pan becomes non-kosher. If your recipe calls for multiple eggs, break each one into the glass separately, so you don't waste all of the eggs if the last one is not kosher!
Forbidden Fats and Nerves

The sciatic nerve and its adjoining blood vessels may not be eaten. The process of removing this nerve is time consuming and not cost-effective, so most American kosher slaughterers simply sell the hind quarters to non-kosher butchers.

A certain kind of fat, known as chelev, which surrounds the vital organs and the liver, may not be eaten. Kosher butchers remove this. Modern scientists have found biochemical differences between this type of fat and the permissible fat around the muscles and under the skin.
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby JHumes » Tue Jan 18, 2011 2:25 pm

Grouse and Woodcock aren't on the list,if you had to give me a yes or no what would it be?
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby wems2371 » Tue Jan 18, 2011 3:07 pm

I googled out of curiosity, and found this interesting page that touches on pheasant, quail, guineas etc. No mention of woodcock, but there is a contact link, where I'm sure they could give you their best answer.

http://www.star-k.org/cons-keep-basics-birds.htm
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby twofeathers » Wed Jan 19, 2011 12:07 am

The mammals and birds that may be eaten must be slaughtered in accordance with Jewish law. (Deut. 12:21). We may not eat animals that died of natural causes (Deut. 14:21) or that were killed by other animals. In addition, the animal must have no disease or flaws in the organs at the time of slaughter. These restrictions do not apply to fish; only to the flocks and herds (Num. 11:22).

Guess you gotta slaughter them according to Jewish law. Not sure what that is but..... Did they use hunting dogs and shotguns back then? Seems kinda trivial to me just my opinion. Not wanting to get into a religious debate but logic would say if you were concerned about it then don't do it.

Interesting thread though.
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby kninebirddog » Wed Jan 19, 2011 1:15 am

If you really read into it what I am getting the Kosher part is freeing the meat of any blood So with the hunting of game this wouldn't be Kosher Killed as it states how to slaughter the animal...
also interesting about kosher pans and utensils a pan that had blood in it is no longer kosher
7. Utensils (including pots and pans and other cooking surfaces) that have come into contact with meat may not be used with dairy, and vice versa. Utensils that have come into contact with non-kosher food may not be used with kosher food. This applies only where the contact occurred while the food was hot.


Ritual slaughter is known as shechitah, and the person who performs the slaughter is called a shochet, both from the Hebrew root Shin-Cheit-Teit. The method of slaughter is a quick, deep stroke across the throat with a perfectly sharp blade with no nicks or unevenness. This method is painless, causes unconsciousness within two seconds, and is widely recognized as the most humane method of slaughter possible.

Another advantage of shechitah is that it ensures rapid, complete draining of the blood, which is also necessary to render the meat kosher.




Contrary to popular misconception, rabbis or other religious officials do not "bless" food to make it kosher. There are blessings that observant Jews recite over food before eating it, but these blessings have nothing to do with making the food kosher. Food can be kosher without a rabbi or priest ever becoming involved with it: the vegetables from your garden are undoubtedly kosher (as long as they don't have any bugs, which are not kosher!). However, in our modern world of processed foods, it is difficult to know what ingredients are in your food and how they were processed, so it is helpful to have a rabbi examine the food and its processing and assure kosher consumers that the food is kosher
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby Georgia Boy » Thu Jan 20, 2011 5:29 pm

Kosher and "Clean or Unclean" are different. A "clean" meat may not be Kosher. All birds except birds of prey, ravens and vultures are "clean"I think. Check Leviticus chapter 11
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby wills1235 » Fri Jan 21, 2011 1:28 am

My understanding of kosher law, from the perspective of an open minded but not religious chef, is as follows: The kosher law was intended to keep people from getting sick from eating from unsafe sources. Sorta like our modern FDA or restaurant health inspectors. It's always overkill unless they take a bribe, then it's blind eye syndrome.

Any way you look at it, eat what tastes good and doesn't kill ya. And if you get taken down by a woodcock, hey, natural selection pal.
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby doco » Fri Jan 21, 2011 6:53 am

Just a little humor. Couldn't you just name the dog "Rabbi" or have "Rabbi" carved into the gunstock?
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby PZulu » Tue Oct 11, 2011 1:00 pm

for birds its no predators, no scavengers. says Chabad...which I dont think anyone eats anyway.
http://www.chabad.org/library/howto/wiz ... Kosher.htm

check this out, would you really eat any of these birds that AREN'T kosher?
http://www.milechai.com/judaism/kosher-animals.html

I think shooting an animal though, automatically could make it not kosher, unless you have to shoot it to survive. I think you have to slaughter it according to kosher law so.... ....there were also no guns when the Torah was written....

carving the magen david into the gunstock would be a sweet idea to make youreself a kosher weapon. or buy yourself some Israeli weapons and help their economy. There is always a reason to buy more guns now isnt there....
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Re: Kosher Woodcock?

Postby MTR » Tue Oct 11, 2011 1:04 pm

I guess I can't make woodcock rumaki with water chestnuts and a warp of bacon.... :?
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